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house Bill H.R. 338

Should Federal Job Training Programs for the Energy and Manufacturing Industries be Prioritized?

Argument in favor

The U.S. energy and manufacturing industries will be providing many opportunities for skilled workers in the future, so the federal government should expand its job training offerings in those sectors — especially for underrepresented groups.

Butch's Opinion
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01/09/2017
This country should move more towards renewable energy.
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Duane 's Opinion
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01/10/2017
Prioritize for jobs in clean energy, every day jobs such as building, welding, operating robots. Re-institute vocational training in high school and community colleges. Retrain coal country for wind and solar energy. Relocate as necessary.
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Anna's Opinion
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01/28/2017
Only if there is an emphasis on renewable energy.
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Argument opposed

This bill’s fatal flaw is that it treats all energy sources equally when it comes to providing job training. The future of the energy sector is in renewable energy, and that should be the emphasis of federal workforce development efforts.

Meghan 's Opinion
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01/08/2017
This should not move forward without specifying that such resources should be funneled toward renewable energy.
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Liz's Opinion
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01/09/2017
There needs to be specificity regarding an emphasis on renewable energy. Additional training and effort put into fossil fuels is only moving the U.S. backwards as so many other countries are moving forward.
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Jacob's Opinion
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01/09/2017
I would be in favor of it if it focused on renewable energy
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bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
  • The house Passed June 12th, 2017
    Passed by Voice Vote
      house Committees
      Committee on Education and Labor
      Committee on Energy and Commerce
      Energy
    IntroducedJanuary 5th, 2017

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What is House Bill H.R. 338?

This bill would direct the Dept. of Energy (DOE) to prioritize education and training for energy and manufacturing-related jobs to increase the number of skilled workers in those fields.

Included in this effort would be businesses in those industries, educational institutions, state and local workforce development organizations, and other federal agencies. The sectors of the energy and manufacturing industries covered by this bill include energy efficiency, pipelines, utilities, oil and gas, coal, renewable sources, advanced manufacturing, and construction.

The Secretary of Energy would collaborate with schools, energy and manufacturing industries, state agencies, and national laboratories to better understand the regional workforce needs of those industries.

Job training and workforce development opportunities for workers from underrepresented communities including minorities, women, and veterans would be prioritized. The DOE would collaborate with industry and community-based workforce organization to identify students and candidates from these groups to participate in training and apprenticeship programs. It would also seek to promote STEM education (science, technology, engineering, and math) at all levels of the education system.

The DOE would increase outreach to employers and job trainers who work with unemployed energy and manufacturing workers. It would also preemptively provide assistance to workers employed at facilities scheduled for closure.

Five years after this bill’s enactment, the DOE would report to Congress with a national outlook for the energy and manufacturing industries, which includes a summary of jobs created by this legislation.

No additional funds would be authorized by this legislation, so all required activities must be carried out using existing funds.

Impact

People from underrepresented groups, including minorities, women, and veterans who would benefit from energy and manufacturing job training programs; schools and institutions of higher education; community- and state-based workforce development groups; the energy and manufacturing industries; relevant federal agencies and the DOE.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 338

$0.00
A CBO cost estimate in the last session of Congress found that enacting this legislation would have no significant impact on the federal budget.

More Information

In-Depth: Sponsoring Rep. Bobby Rush (D-IL) introduced this bill during the last session of Congress to expand access to job training in the energy and manufacturing industries, particularly among underrepresented groups:
“Through the promotion of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, or STEM, education for minorities, women, and veterans this bill will help tap a reservoir of talented Americans who are hungry for their chance to experience the American Dream. Further, if enacted, this bill would provide an invaluable opportunity to affect real change in the lives of American families throughout the nation, by engaging underrepresented communities in the lucrative sectors of energy and manufacturing-related jobs, careers, and entrepreneurial opportunities and help them climb their way into the Middle Class.”

In the 114th Congress this legislation was passed by the House Energy and Commerce Committee on a voice vote and it enjoyed the support of three cosponsors — including one Democratic and two Republican lawmakers. The House as a whole also passed the bill by voice vote, though the Senate never considered it.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell
(Photo Credit: Flickr user El guaje29)

Official Title

To promote a 21st century energy and manufacturing workforce.

    This country should move more towards renewable energy.
    Like (279)
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    This should not move forward without specifying that such resources should be funneled toward renewable energy.
    Like (1144)
    Follow
    Share
    There needs to be specificity regarding an emphasis on renewable energy. Additional training and effort put into fossil fuels is only moving the U.S. backwards as so many other countries are moving forward.
    Like (560)
    Follow
    Share
    I would be in favor of it if it focused on renewable energy
    Like (379)
    Follow
    Share
    Prioritize for jobs in clean energy, every day jobs such as building, welding, operating robots. Re-institute vocational training in high school and community colleges. Retrain coal country for wind and solar energy. Relocate as necessary.
    Like (176)
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    Share
    I do think that energy and manufacturing jobs should be prioritized, but not just any energy jobs. With climate change becoming a bigger threat by the day it's my opinion renewable energy jobs should be the ones prioritized, but sadly this bill doesn't specify. This means that any type of energy can be prioritized including ones detrimental to the environment such as coal and other fossil fuels. I would be fine with this bill if it specified renewable energy instead of leaving it to be interpreted.
    Like (166)
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    Only if there is an emphasis on renewable energy.
    Like (69)
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    Of course training for jobs is important, but yes, this needs to specify that the spending is only for renewable, sustainable energy. As it is, it appears to be an attempt to manifest Trump's empty promises to reinvigorate dying (let's face it, dead) industries based on unsustainable energy sources. EDITED TO ADD: I am 100% for job training in relevant industries that won't break their employees' hearts and the environment not too far down the road. I feel for those communities and families affected by the changes in the American manufacturing landscape, but training them for jobs that literally don't exist anymore (or soon won't) is dishonest and fatally short-sighted. We can do a much better job caring for people who want to work by training them for jobs that have a future.
    Like (58)
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    In essence, this is another federal affirmative action bill. I don't think we need to establish quotas for minorities, women, or any other subgroup or our society. Also, job training should come from the private sector or the states and should be FREE OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT'S INTERFERENCE AND FUNDING! I'm constantly amazed by all of you who have embraced the idea that Big Brother should take care of you from the cradle to the grave! You seem to think that it's perfectly okay to keep growing the federal government and spending us further and further into debt. Why are you all okay with the Feds telling you how to live your life, what to do, say, and think, who to believe, what you should eat, what kind of transportation and energy you should use, what you should do with your own land, how you should rear your own children, etc., etc., etc.???! If you really want to live in a socialist country, please go live somewhere else! The rest of us are going to keep fighting for a free Republic, where people's rights are upheld!
    Like (18)
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    The bill does not recognize that the fossil fuel sector (or coal) is trending downward due to limited resources. More focus is needed on alternative energy options.
    Like (15)
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    Job training is an investment for the future. We cannot be investing in the future of oil, natural gas and coal at the expense of our planet. Scrap this and put those resources toward training for jobs in the renewable energy sector. We're out of time.
    Like (13)
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    The bill needs to prioritize renewable energy so that the training is more efficient in the long run.
    Like (12)
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    While I do agree with this I do believe and emphasis on renewable energy should be made. Our dependence on coal especially is a great concern of mine.
    Like (12)
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    Only if it targets renewable energy.
    Like (11)
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    This bill treats all energy sectors as "equal," which presents a couple drawbacks in my mind. First, the more powerful coal and oil lobbies might more easily skew federal focus toward their industries, allowing for less time and effort spent on renewable energy industries. And if this were to happen, the second bad outcome would be that we end up focusing on non-sustainable energy production, many of the jobs for which are already gone and won't come back. I'm in support of some kind of bill like this, but one that prioritizes encouragement of training in renewable energy sectors.
    Like (8)
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    Despite the promises made and the overstatement of jobs being lost to immigrants or being outsourced, the majority of the manufacturing jobs have been lost to automation. These jobs are not coming back. And we don't have a workforce that desires to fill them. We need to provide educational resources to folks who will lose their jobs because of the inevitable roll of progress and innovation. Help them become innovators! Thank you!
    Like (7)
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    Less coal and energy that is destroying our planet. And more training for renewable energy jobs would be the ideal in any bill of this type.
    Like (6)
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    I would favor this as long as it focuses on more environmental friendly renewable energy sources!
    Like (6)
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    Yes, we should prioritize training for energy and manufacturing jobs. However, the bill should stipulate for training in fields of renewable energy. I'm not happy with training for more big oil jobs, which this bill allows for, so I vote Nay.
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    Don't let the wording deceive you. This is not stating that renewable energy will be prioritized.
    Like (5)
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