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senate Bill S. Joint Res. 20

Should Congress Block the Sale of $750 Million in Bombs & Missiles to Bahrain?

Argument in favor

As part of the Saudi-led coalition fighting Iran-backed rebels in Yemen, the government of Bahrain is worsening the humanitarian crisis and inflicting civilian casualties in Yemen through its bombing campaign. The U.S. shouldn’t provide Bahrain weapons to continue the campaign.

IllWill's Opinion
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last Thursday
We need to stop arming the world and making the planet a more dangerous place! Also, by selling them weapons, we’re only enabling them to continue their war crimes in Yemen!
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jimK's Opinion
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last Thursday
I would prefer supporting our known, long-established allies who are fully honoring their commitments- such as most of NATO. We should not be casually arming the world- past experience in Afghanistan should be a clue.
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Ken's Opinion
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last Thursday
Arming our enemies is extremely poor practice.
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Argument opposed

Bahrain is an ally in the effort to bring stability to the Middle East, and there’s no guarantee this equipment would be used in Yemen because another ceasefire could be reached soon. Congress should allow this sale to go through and continue to monitor the situation in Yemen.

Geoff's Opinion
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last Thursday
Why stop the sales of weapons to Bahrain when Saudi Arabia has worse human rights violations than Bahrain? Stop selling weapons to any middle eastern country including Israel.
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Steve 's Opinion
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last Thursday
congress and the senate are unqualified clowns and grifters
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Jim2423's Opinion
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last Thursday
Hey this is jobs, money in the bank. If the Saudi’s don’t buy ours, they will buy Russian. Your intentions are good, but we might as well step up to the plate first. Don’t forget we sold supplies to Germany as well before we entered WWII. Do not support this proposal.
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joint resolution Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The house has not voted
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Foreign Relations
    IntroducedMay 13th, 2019

What is Senate Bill S. Joint Res. 20?

This resolution would prohibit the $750 million sale of certain missiles, bombs, and guidance systems to the government of Bahrain to support its F-16 aircraft fleet using powers given to Congress under the Arms Export Control Act.

As a joint resolution, this legislation would advance to the House if passed by the Senate and would have the force of law if enacted.

Impact

The government of Bahrain; defense contractors; and the Trump administration.

Cost of Senate Bill S. Joint Res. 20

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-DepthSen. Rand Paul (R-KY) introduced this resolution to block an arms sale to Bahrain over its role in the Saudi-led coalition’s campaign against Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen, which has led to many civilian casualties and precipitated a humanitarian crisis in Yemen.

The administration explained the proposed sale through the Defense Security Cooperation Agency:

“This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security objectives of the United States by helping to improve the security of a major non-NATO ally which is an important security partner in the region. Our mutual defense interests anchor our relationship and the Royal Bahraini Air Force (RBAF) plays a significant role in Bahrain’s defense.”

Paul’s resolution excludes a separate arms sale of the Patriot missile system to Bahrain at a cost of $2.478 billion.

During the last Congress, Paul used the Arms Export Control Act to force a vote that would’ve blocked the sale of about $350 million in missiles and launchers to Bahrain, but the Senate voted to table his motion.


Of NoteThe Arms Export Control Act requires the administration to notify Congress 30 calendar days before it concludes a foreign military sale to a non-major ally and allows Congress to modify or reject the sale using expedited procedures.

After a disapproval resolution is introduced in the Senate, the Foreign Relations Committee has 10 calendar days to report it, and if no action is taken the lawmaker introducing it can force a floor vote on a motion to discharge the resolution. If it succeeds, the resolution is then considered with overall debate limited to 10 hours. The House doesn’t have a discharge procedure, although the resolution is still given expedited consideration in the chamber.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force Photo - MSgt. Andy Dunaway / Public Domain)

AKA

A joint resolution relating to the disapproval of the proposed sale to the Government of Bahrain of certain defense articles and services.

Official Title

A joint resolution relating to the disapproval of the proposed sale to the Government of Bahrain of certain defense articles and services.