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house Bill H.R. 7187

Extending the National Flood Insurance Program For One Week

Argument in favor

There is broad consensus that the NFIP is poorly run, and Congress’s short-term reauthorizations of the program without addressing its inefficiencies is unsustainable. This extension is needed to give Congress another opportunity to pass long-term reforms and prevent the NFIP from shutting down.

A's Opinion
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11/29/2018
Extend it but also begin banning development in flood zones!
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SneakyPete's Opinion
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11/30/2018
PASS THE SHORT-TERM EXTENSION AS REQUESTED There is broad consensus that the NFIP is poorly run, and Congress’s short-term reauthorizations of the program without addressing its inefficiencies is unsustainable. This extension is needed to give Congress another opportunity to pass long-term reforms and prevent the NFIP from shutting down. SneakyPete...... 11*29*18......
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collins1129's Opinion
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11/29/2018
Vote yes to extend the national flood insurance program one week. This program needs to be reworked to address its shortcomings this year.
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Argument opposed

A one-week extension of the NFIP is unlikely to result in Congress finally coming to an agreement on long-term changes to the program, after numerous short-term extensions in the past. This Congress should extend the program so that the incoming Congress can address the issue early next year.

burrkitty's Opinion
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11/29/2018
Just stop. That program needs to die anyway. It just encourages irresponsible building in flood zones. We shouldn’t be encouraging it. Building in V zones should be illegal and existing structures removed. Zones with the A classification should be prohibited from building new construction. Only remodeling should be allowed.
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IllWill's Opinion
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11/29/2018
A one week extension? Are you kidding me? Does anyone really expect Congress to get its act together in one week? This program needs to be massively reformed. With climate change becoming an ever bigger issue, areas that are already at risk for flooding are going to be at even greater risk. We cannot encourage more building in areas that have the highest risk for floods and many properties that have the highest risks need to be torn down.
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Jim2423's Opinion
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11/30/2018
Their flood program only seems to help the wealthy. Instead of paying folks to rebuild in flood prone areas maybe maybe use that money to move them to safer areas and use Dutch tactics in flood control.
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bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house Passed November 30th, 2018
    Roll Call Vote 350 Yea / 46 Nay
    IntroducedNovember 28th, 2018

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What is House Bill H.R. 7187?

This bill would extend the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) through December 7, 2018 — it’s currently set to expire on November 30, 2018. It wouldn’t reform the program, it's a short-term, blanket extension that would align the program’s expiration with the expiration of funding for several other federal agencies to give Congress more time to enact a long-term extension and reform bill. If the program’s authorization were to lapse, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) wouldn’t be able to issue new flood insurance policies, which are required for some home sales to be transacted — but existing policies would remain in effect.

Impact

Home and property owners in flood-prone areas; Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA); National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP); the Senate’s farm bill; the current Congress; and the 116th Congress.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 7187

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-Depth: Rep. Tom MacArthur (R-NJ) introduced this one week extension of the NFIP to prevent it from lapsing while Congress attempts to reform the program by enacting a long-term extension, and explained its necessity after introducing a previous short-term extension:

“Without flood insurance, mortgages are unavailable, homes cannot be bought or sold and people are left exposed to nature’s ravages. This can has been kicked down the road long enough. [NFIP’s reauthorization] must happen for the sake of 140 million Americans who live in coastal counties.”

On the issue of a long-term NFIP reauthorization, Rep. MacArthur promised to continue working with House and Senate leadership on a long-term reauthorization that “gives homeowners certainty, ensures affordability, increases mitigation funds for shore communities, and instills accountability at FEMA for how they treat disaster victims”


Of Note: The National Flood Insurance Program was created in 1968 to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. The NFIP provides affordable flood insurance to property owners, renters, and businesses. It also encourages communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations.

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which administers the NFIP, these efforts help mitigate the effects of flooding on new and improved structures. Additionally, for millions of households in the United States, the NFIP is their only source of flood insurance.

However, some argue that the NFIP is inefficient and poorly run. In its 50 years of operation, the NFIP has borrowed over $30 billion from taxpayers, and it currently operates on a $1.4 billion annual deficit. Additionally, some critics contend that the NFIP is not as innovative as it should be, given that it is a company with $1.2 trillion of insurance coverage.

Due to the NFIP’s large debt burden (it was $24.6 billion in 2017) and an imbalance between incoming premium payments and payments out to owners of flood-damaged properties, no one seriously expects the program’s financial situation to improve if it continues to be run as is. The Government Accountability Office (GAO), recognizing the NFIP’s untenable financial position, has had it on its “High Risk List” since 2006.

Over the past few years, the NFIP’s reauthorization and the terms under which the program should be extended have become a contentious issue in Congress.

The NFIP was originally set to expire on September 30, 2017, but was extended on a short-term basis to December 8, 2017. In the wake of massive storms in 2017, including hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, the House passed Congressman Sean Duffy’s (R-WI) 21st Century Floor Reform Act (H.R. 2874), a collection of seven bills that would have reauthorized the NFIP for five years, introduced private market competition, and provided programmatic reforms to help policyholders.

However, the Senate did not act on H.R. 2874, and as a result, the NFIP received a second short-term extension through December 22, 2017 and a third short-term extension through January 19, 2018. The NFIP then briefly lapsed between January 20, 2018 and January 22, 2018, before receiving a fourth short-term reauthorization through February 8, 2018. It then lapsed for eight hours during a brief government shutdown in the early morning of February 9, 2018 before receiving an extension through July 31, 2018 in the omnibus spending bill.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell & Lorelei Yang

(Photo Credit: iStock.com / Marc Bruxelle)

Official Title

National Flood Insurance Program Further Extension Act of 2018

    Extend it but also begin banning development in flood zones!
    Like (74)
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    Share
    Just stop. That program needs to die anyway. It just encourages irresponsible building in flood zones. We shouldn’t be encouraging it. Building in V zones should be illegal and existing structures removed. Zones with the A classification should be prohibited from building new construction. Only remodeling should be allowed.
    Like (53)
    Follow
    Share
    A one week extension? Are you kidding me? Does anyone really expect Congress to get its act together in one week? This program needs to be massively reformed. With climate change becoming an ever bigger issue, areas that are already at risk for flooding are going to be at even greater risk. We cannot encourage more building in areas that have the highest risk for floods and many properties that have the highest risks need to be torn down.
    Like (30)
    Follow
    Share
    Their flood program only seems to help the wealthy. Instead of paying folks to rebuild in flood prone areas maybe maybe use that money to move them to safer areas and use Dutch tactics in flood control.
    Like (24)
    Follow
    Share
    PASS THE SHORT-TERM EXTENSION AS REQUESTED There is broad consensus that the NFIP is poorly run, and Congress’s short-term reauthorizations of the program without addressing its inefficiencies is unsustainable. This extension is needed to give Congress another opportunity to pass long-term reforms and prevent the NFIP from shutting down. SneakyPete...... 11*29*18......
    Like (16)
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    Vote yes to extend the national flood insurance program one week. This program needs to be reworked to address its shortcomings this year.
    Like (9)
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    Absolutely not. The people who live inland pay higher insurance premiums to help cover the cost of these million dollar houses built on the coastal lines for the rich. If you can't afford 100% of the cost of flood insurance you can't afford to live on a coastal line. Wanting help from the government to subsidize your flood insurance is welfare for the rich!!! The government needs to get out of the insurance business, they can't even balance their own budget!
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    Get the government out of the insurance business.
    Like (6)
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    If information indicates it’s necessary, then do it. What I oppose, rebuilding in the same area destroyed by hurricane, or river flooding and earthquakes. Definition of insanity is repeating the same steps to get the same results. All insurance payouts are amortized throughout all homeowner polices throughout our country. Stop the World I need To get Off.
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    Let’s help those in need, especially in the light of this Christmas season.
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    Why is the government in the flood insurance. This is a program that should’ve never began. If you can afford the insurance you should not live there.
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    I think the government should discontinue the program which encourages people to live in obvious flood plains and cost the tax payers billions
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    The wise man built his house upon the ROCK!😁
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    If your beachfront home is destroyed by a coastal storm you get to rebuild ONCE and only once. I think I read that some time ago. If that isn't the law it should be. The same should apply to floods. Local news outlets in NC report some homes have been repaired 5 or more times since hurricane Irene. Does that make any sense? Rebuild once then relocate to higher, safer ground. You might want to avoid places that are prone to wildfires, tornados and other natural disasters. Rewrite the law. Stop subsidizing stupidity with our tax $$$.
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    The Federal Government needs to get out of the Insurance business!
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    Figure out a way to discourage housing in flood areas, without devastating people who can't afford to move and face floods.
    Like (2)
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    Many people are still feeling ramifications of flooding. I think an additional week isn’t a deal breaker. It provides more time to create a long term solution. I wouldn’t extend a short term solution any further though. Eventually our leaders need to feel pressure to pass the right plan.
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    Address climate change and climate refugees without the US. Talk about birth control, limiting driving, the limits of public benefits and the benefits of alternative energy and healthcare. We need rule of law not rule of thuggery
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    Wait for new Congress...
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    Pass long term reforms.
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