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bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions
  • The house Passed July 19th, 2013
    Roll Call Vote 221 Yea / 207 Nay
      house Committees
      House Committee on Education and the Workforce
      House Committee on Financial Services
    IntroducedJune 6th, 2013

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What is it?

H.R. 5 (the Student Success Act) aims to offer states greater control over their public education programs, while weaning them off federal funding.

Through changes made to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, and the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)
H.R. 5 would:
  • Eliminate over 70 federal education-improvement programsalong with their employees and replace them with a "Local Academic Flexible Grant" to support state initiatives.
  • Grant state and local governments more authority to directly evaluate and improve programs in low-performing schools.
  • Repeal the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) metric used by the federal government to measure school performances.
  • Introduce state measures to help school districts evaluate teacher performance in the classroom.
  • Consolidate various educator programs into a single Teacher and School Leader Flexible Grant program to run a holistic bunch of initiatives that address hiring, training and retaining teachers.
  • Re-authorize the Charter Schools program, which includes programs to promote charter school education.
  • Authorize more resources for programs assisting homeless youth.
  • Increase transparency in the Department of Education.


Finally, the bill prohibits the Secretary of Education from:

  • Imposing assessments on state school districts in exchange for exemption from federal laws.
  • Creating new regulations for school districts, specifically additional standards and assessments.
  • Demanding that states change their standards of academic measurement.

Impact

Students in U.S. public schools (especially those in low income school districts), educators, administrators, the No Child Left Behind Act, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, and other Federal education programs.

Cost

$137.00 Billion
The CBO estimates that implementing H.R. 5 would authorize the appropriation of approximately $137 billion between 2014 and 2018, and it would have $85.6 billion in discretionary costs in the same period.

More Information

In Depth:

Proponents of H.R. 5 — or the Student Success Act — claim that the bill would achieve a popular bipartisan wish: a major revamp of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. Enacted in 2001, the NCLB created assessment standards that schools are required to use to receive federal funding. Since it's implementation, the NCLB has been frequently criticized on both sides of the aisle for being intrusive, financially burdensome, and overly reliant on standardized testing.

The Student Success Act's supporters say it would reduce federal waste by terminating duplicate programs while consolidating others. H.R. 5, they contend, empowers individual school districts to assess and remove incompetent teachers, and have a stronger influence over what is taught in schools.

The most serious complaint made against H.R. 5 is a loophole in the Title I law that this bill won’t close. Title I was designed to ensure that poorer schools received equitable funding compared to non-Title I schools. A provision in the NCLB Act allows schools to demonstrate “comparable service” if there is a similar teacher-student ratio. But they don’t need to demonstrate equitable payment of teachers or funding per pupil, which means school districts have the discretion to over-fund wealthy schools and under-fund poorer ones. Critics of H.R. 5 claim that it will effectively sanction an education policy that is harming America’s neediest students.


Others worry that removing federal oversight may lead to other serious inequities in schools. They point to examples like a 2012 Virginia accountability plan that listed achievement targets that were significantly lower for
African American students compared to White students. H.R. 5 also relies on states to take greater initiative when it comes to identifying and fixing under-performing schools.

Media:

Sponsoring Rep. John Kline (R-MN) Press Release

CBO Cost Estimate

Star Tribune

Education Workforce

American Progress


(Photo Credit: Flickr user USDAgov)

AKA

Student Success Act

Official Title

To support State and local accountability for public education, protect State and local authority, inform parents of the performance of their children's schools, and for other purposes.

    H.R. 5 lacks an opt-out provision for states, an approach known as A-PLUS, that would allow states to opt-out of the programs that fall under NCLB and allocate federal education dollars within broad parameters rather than in accordance with federal mandates. Instead, the bill contains language that allows states not to participate in programs in exchange for losing the entirety of their federal funding (that taxpayers were already forced to send to Washington). Because participation in federal education programs has always been “voluntary” (at the cost of losing billions in funding) these provisions don’t change anything about current law.
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    Politicians need to listen to the teachers on this one. Students are suffering as a direct result from all the standardized testing. Teachers are forced to put students passing these tests above making sure the kids are actually learning, or else they will lose their jobs. Cater to the kids, not the government.
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    State Organizations administrate State education...they are responsible for it and how well it is being done. The federal education programs guide and assist...they should never dictate or require qualifying standards to receive federally obtained public funds meant to assist states educate their children and doing their job.
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    Oklahoma legislators are destroying public education and blaming the history cutting budget cut on the crash of the fossil fuel industry, in reality, this state was already facing budget shortfalls before the crash.
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    While there should be some standards that are met nationally, IN GENERAL the states and/or teachers should be able to decide what they teach and how they teach it.
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    Get rid of the DOE and we will take a huge step toward American youth being properly prepared for the real world. States and communities should decide what is most important for kids to learn, not the federal government.
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    Every child should have to be taught general subjects and skills. We have seen the results of giving the states control. In some states they have completely white washed education and said slavery was a side issue. Furthermore, in some states they value stem education less and drastically defund programs that can lead to better academic success like Head Start. We need a federal floor for standards to make sure that states do not dilute their classrooms.
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    Education should be left to the states, simple as that.
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    Some students are never going to be able to reach certain benchmarks because of a variety of factors regardless of the teacher's efforts and abilities. At certain schools, even the worst teachers have students who are going to reach a certain level of academic success, and at other more underprivileged schools, even the best teachers are not going to be able to get their students up to the same level of academic success. It would be better for the states to decide the benchmarks to achieve, since they would be able to better know how certain schools should be performing, and they can tailor their goals to the schools.
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    Some standards should be met, however the states know what is best for their children.
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    Education has absolutely no place at the federal level, it's a state issue and needs to return to that way.
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    Government does a poor job. It's the states role.
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    State rights always should almost always outweigh Federal authority
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    The federal government needs to get out of the states businesses
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    There must be certain education standards that prevent states from neglecting children with off-the wall learning standards that do nothing to help the students. We need certain standards for teaching and learning at the federal level to ensure every student is given a fair, unindocterinated education free from religeous, or outdated influences/concepts. We must protect our children from bigotry, so all may have a fair chance at aquiring an education.
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    Common Core has to be eradicated. These students are not learning anything in class that will be useful in the workforce. They are just being taught how to take a test, not to be respectful American citizens.
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    Find me the part in the Constitution that authorizes a federal education jurisdiction and I might change my mind.
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    States should have control over the curriculum they teach at their schools, so we can avoid common core education which costs tax payers money, is inefficient, holds students back from excelling, and reaching their highest potential.
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    Not that I'm upset at your decision but I would like to understand why you made it.
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    Regardless of Federal requirements education will always differ to some degree, not just on a state by state basis but also regionally and on the very methods of the educators themselves. Giving states more control should help better understand the individual educational systems and would probably expose some truths about the American educational system.
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