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house Bill H.R. 3381

Childhood Cancer STAR Act

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house Passed December 6th, 2016
    Passed by Voice Vote
      house Committees
      Committee on Energy and Commerce
      Health
    IntroducedJuly 29th, 2015

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Bill Details

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Title

Childhood Cancer STAR Act

Official Title

To maximize discovery, and accelerate development and availability, of promising childhood cancer treatments, and for other purposes.

Summary

Childhood Cancer Survivorship, Treatment, Access, and Research Act of 2015 or the Childhood Cancer STAR Act This bill amends the Public Health Service Act to permit the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to provide support to collect the medical specimens and information of children, adolescents, and young adults with cancer to improve the understanding of these cancers and of the effects of treatment. The national childhood cancer registry is reauthorized through FY2020 and revised to require the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to award grants to states to improve tracking of childhood cancers. This bill amends the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to require manufacturers and distributors of investigational drugs to publish policies for compassionate use of the drugs. The Department of Health and Human Services must: (1) support pilot programs to develop or study models for monitoring and caring for childhood cancer survivors throughout their lives, (2) convene a Workforce Development Collaborative on Medical and Psychosocial Care for Pediatric Cancer Survivors, (3) establish a task force on standards for high-quality childhood cancer survivorship care, and (4) carry out a demonstration project to improve care coordination as childhood cancer survivors transition to adult care. The NIH must support research on: (1) outcomes for, and barriers faced by, pediatric cancer survivors within minority or medically underserved populations; and (2) follow-up care for pediatric cancer survivors, including research on the late effects of cancer treatment and long-term complications. The Government Accountability Office must make recommendations to address barriers to childhood cancer survivors obtaining and paying for adequate medical care.
    Since the 1950's there have not been any new cancer drugs/treatments for children. It's time we focus on healing our kids since we use them in the advertisements to get donations for cancer therapies and of those monies (75% of it) goes to develop cancer drugs for adults!
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    At the moment, there are only 2 drugs approved to specifically target childhood cancer. Pediatric cancer patients are then left to use lower dosages of adult treatments, which don't specifically target their diseases and can leave them with harmful side effects for the rest of their lives, or to suffer with no treatment at all. The STAR Act provides incentives for research into less-profitable cures for rarer types of childhood cancer, and establishes databases to collect biosamples to further our knowledge about childhood cancer. Children with cancer deserve our very best, and the STAR Act is a step in the right direction.
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    Not only will this benefit children, it will provide a much broader picture for cancer research over time.
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    It will incentivize funding for rare illnesses that are overlooked by greedy pharmaceutical companies.
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    It will incentivize funding for rare illnesses that are overlooked by greedy pharmaceutical companies.
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