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house Bill H.R. 3364

Does the U.S. Need to Expand Sanctions on Iran, Russia, and North Korea?

Argument in favor

Iran, Russia, and North Korea have undermined global stability and threatened U.S. national security through their actions. Expanded sanctions would hold these adversaries accountable and give the U.S. important economic and diplomatic leverage.

Vlad's Opinion
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07/25/2017
This Bill should be 3 separate bills. One size does not fit all.
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James's Opinion
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07/25/2017
This should be 3 different bills since the issues with each country is different.
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Lynn's Opinion
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07/25/2017
Russia is meddling in our internal decisions. We must prevent them
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Argument opposed

Strengthening sanctions against Iran, Russia, and North Korea will only worsen U.S. relations with these nations and increase the risk of war. Iran and North Korea will continue their missile programs, while Russia is set on challenging the West at every opportunity.

Kodiwodi's Opinion
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07/25/2017
These are three separate countries with three separate situations. Each should have it's own solution and thus it's own bill. Maybe actually Iran needs fewer sanctions while N. Korea needs more. Since we are going at this with no experienced diplomacy we can't just have one bill fits all countries. Actually think about this instead of trying to make up for lost time. Do things well not fast.
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Nick's Opinion
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07/25/2017
Can't do this as a Blanket bill. We need one for each country that addresses their specific issues..
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Simon's Opinion
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07/25/2017
It makes sense to sanction nations individually, not all lumped together. I support Russian sanctions for their actions in Ukraine, and, to a degree, against North Korea for their continued pursuit of nuclear warheads, but Iran has thus far complied with the United States and the global community at large. What we need now is closer relations with stable nations in Persia and the Levant, in order to better combat extremism and improve the lives of those living there.
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bill Progress


  • EnactedAugust 2nd, 2017
    The President signed this bill into law
  • The senate Passed July 27th, 2017
    Roll Call Vote 98 Yea / 2 Nay
  • The house Passed July 25th, 2017
    Roll Call Vote 419 Yea / 3 Nay
      house Committees
      Committee on Armed Services
      Committee on Financial Services
      Trade
      Committee on Foreign Affairs
      Committee on Oversight and Reform
      Committee on Rules
      Committee on the Judiciary
      Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure
      Aviation
      Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation
      Committee on Ways and Means
    IntroducedJuly 24th, 2017

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What is House Bill H.R. 3364?

(Update 8/2/17): President Donald Trump signed this bill into law. This bill — known as the Countering Adversarial Nations Through Sanctions — would impose additional sanctions on Iran, Russia, and North Korea for undermining global stability through tests of ballistic missiles, support for terrorism, and interventions in neighboring countries among other transgressions.

Iran

The bill would mandate sanctions on people who engage in or pose a risk of contributing to Iran’s ballistic missile program and those who support such persons. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) would be sanctioned for supporting terrorism (it’s already sanctioned for non-proliferation and human rights abuses), and people who violate the UN arms embargo against Iran. Sanctions could only be lifted on persons who supported Iran’s terrorism or ballistic missile program if they have ceased support for those activities for three months.

It would also require the Depts. of State, Defense, and Treasury to work with the Director of National Intelligence to submit a strategy every two years aimed at deterring conventional and asymmetric Iranian activities that threaten the U.S. and key allies in the Middle East, North Africa, and beyond.

Reports would be required on U.S. citizens detained by Iran and discrepancies between U.S. and European Union sanctions on Iran. The president would be authorized to waive sanctions against individuals on a case-by-case basis for up to 180 days if it’s determined to be in the national security interests of the U.S.

Russia

This bill would make into law and strengthen existing sanctions contained in executive orders on Russia, including the sanctions' impact on Russian energy projects and on debt financing in several key economic sectors. It would also provide for a mandated congressional review if sanctions are relaxed, suspended, or terminated.

New sanctions would be imposed on Russians involved in corruption; evading sanctions; abusing human rights; supplying weapons to the Assad regime; conducting malicious cyber activity on the Russian government's behalf; the corrupt privatization state-owned assets; and those doing business with the Russian intelligence and defense sectors.

Additionally, new sanctions would be imposed on several sectors of Russia's economy including mining, metals, shipping, and railways. An exception would be made for activities involving the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA), which currently relies on certain Russian-made equipment.

The bill would also provide assistance to strengthen democratic institutions and look to counter disinformation across Central and Eastern European countries that are vulnerable to Russian aggression and interference. It would also reaffirm the importance of NATO in contributing to maintaining stability around the world.

A study on the flow of illegal finance involving Russia and a formal assessment of U.S. exposure to Russian state-owned entities would be required.

North Korea

This bill would strengthen sanctions against the North Korean regime for its nuclear weapons program and human rights violations. It sanctions individuals who are involved in the use of North Korean forced labor, who buy metals from or provide military fuel to the regime, and prohibits accounts that can be used to gain access to U.S. currency. Goods produced in whole or in part by North Korean forced labor would be prohibited from entering the U.S. Aid to foreign governments that buy or sell North Korean weapons would be cut off.

The executive branch would be required to determine within 90 days whether North Korea should be re-designated as a state sponsor of terror. It’d also require a report on cooperation between North Korea and Iran on the two countries’ nuclear weapons programs, and a report on the implementation of U.N. Security Council resolutions sanctioning North Korea by other countries.

Impact

Individuals sanctioned for supporting Iran’s ballistic missile program, terrorism, arms embargo violations, or human rights abuses; the Depts. of State, Defense, and Treasury plus the Director of National Intelligence; and the President. North Korea and the nations or individuals who are connected to its nuclear weapons program or its use of forced labor; and the federal government.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 3364

The CBO estimates that enacting this bill would cost $12 million over the 2017-2027 period while bringing in $26 million in revenue from fines, reducing deficits by $14 million net over that period.

More Information

In-Depth: House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce (R-CA) and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) issued the following statement on the introductions of this bipartisan, bicameral sanctions package:

“North Korea, Iran, and Russia have in different ways all threatened their neighbors and actively sought to undermine American interests. Earlier this year the House passed sanctions on North Korea by a vote of 419-1. Several weeks ago, the Senate passed sanctions legislation on Iran and Russia. Following that vote, the House worked diligently with our colleagues in the Senate to strengthen the bill with the inclusion of the House-passed sanctions that target the Kim regime’s ballistic missile program, which could soon put American cities within range of a nuclear attack. We also addressed original provisions that would have punished American job creators while benefiting a growing Russian energy oligarchy. Additionally, we help bolster the energy security of our European allies by maintaining their access to key energy resources outside of Russia. The bill the House will vote on next week will now exclusively focus on these nations and hold them accountable for their dangerous actions.”

The House passed a bill expanding sanctions on North Korea on a 419-1 vote on May 4, 2017 while the Senate passed its bill broadening sanctions on Iran and Russia on a 98-2 vote on June 15, 2017. The Senate’s bill in its original form was unable to be considered by the House because of a blue slip violation, meaning that it contained provisions related to taxes and spending that are supposed to originate in the House under the Constitution.

That snag led to the emergence of this comprehensive sanctions package, which has the support of three House cosponsors, including McCarthy, Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer (D-MD) and the Foreign Affairs Committee’s top Democrat, Eliot Engel (NY).


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: Kremlin / Public Domain)

AKA

Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act

Official Title

To provide congressional review and to counter aggression by the Governments of Iran, the Russian Federation, and North Korea, and for other purposes.

    This Bill should be 3 separate bills. One size does not fit all.
    Like (440)
    Follow
    Share
    These are three separate countries with three separate situations. Each should have it's own solution and thus it's own bill. Maybe actually Iran needs fewer sanctions while N. Korea needs more. Since we are going at this with no experienced diplomacy we can't just have one bill fits all countries. Actually think about this instead of trying to make up for lost time. Do things well not fast.
    Like (314)
    Follow
    Share
    This should be 3 different bills since the issues with each country is different.
    Like (213)
    Follow
    Share
    Can't do this as a Blanket bill. We need one for each country that addresses their specific issues..
    Like (110)
    Follow
    Share
    Russia is meddling in our internal decisions. We must prevent them
    Like (66)
    Follow
    Share
    It makes sense to sanction nations individually, not all lumped together. I support Russian sanctions for their actions in Ukraine, and, to a degree, against North Korea for their continued pursuit of nuclear warheads, but Iran has thus far complied with the United States and the global community at large. What we need now is closer relations with stable nations in Persia and the Levant, in order to better combat extremism and improve the lives of those living there.
    Like (43)
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    Share
    Yes to Sanctions vs. Russia and North Korea, removing Iran sanctions in line with our diplomatic agreement.
    Like (17)
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    Russia's supposed transgressions are just that, "supposed". They are either not in evidence or not transgressions. There is no meaningful evidence of Russian meddling in our elections and no evidence of any kind that Russia affected the outcomes. As to Russia's reincorporating the Crimea into the Russian state, while this was in violation of international law, it was justified as a response to an act of war by the United States as it engineered a violent coup d'etat in The Ukraine. Russia had to act in self defense by securing its Black Sea flank and protecting it big naval installation in the Crimea. This annexation was bloodless and favored by an overwhelming majority of people in the Crimea which has been part of the Russian state for over 300 years. The Crimea was transferred to the Ukraine around 1950 by Stalin for administrative reasons but it has always been Russian. We threaten Russia all the time. They do not threaten us or our allies. Increased sanctions against Iran and North Korea are also a bad idea which will only increase tension in the world and promote further hostility; and there is no specific reason to impose further sanctions on either of them.
    Like (17)
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    This is not an acceptable way to approach foreign relations. You do not put three countries like these together and act like one size fits all. How ham handed and incompetent can you get?
    Like (14)
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    We need to stop making giant decisions that don't fix the problem or mean anything to the country were working with.
    Like (13)
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    No explanation Needed. The vote on this is a big YES!!!!
    Like (11)
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    Sanctions are against the people, who majority of the time don't have anything to do with the government bodies.
    Like (10)
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    We've started too many wars to be sanctioning anyone but ourselves
    Like (9)
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    Is there any evidence of sanctions actually accomplishing some policy goal, like a change in the behavior of the nation being sanctioned? It seems to me that sanctions just end up harming the civilians (who are innocent), who then end up blaming the US for their situation and supporting their leader (whom we seek to weaken) even more because they become even more dependent on that ruler
    Like (9)
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    Why put off today that which should have been done yesterday.
    Like (8)
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    Please vote to expand sanctions on Russia Iran and North Korea.
    Like (7)
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    Stop this! We need you people to deal with home. Stop interfering in other nations. Sanctions? High tariffs? That hurts our consumers? No loans? That's not a govt function, bankers can decide that! No arms sales, also not a govt function! Bringing home our ambassadors? Why? What possible sanctions does US govt have? None.
    Like (6)
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    yes vs Russia, no vs Iran and relax some and tighten others vs N Korea
    Like (6)
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    We need to vote out of office all neo-conservatives (neo-Trotskyites). We do not need warmongers and endless wars.
    Like (5)
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    Sanctions don't work.
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