Like Countable?

Install the App
TRY NOW

house Bill H.R. 3354

The $1.23 Trillion Omnibus Spending Bill for Fiscal Year 2018

Argument in favor

This spending package provides the resources needed to secure the border, and provide for a variety of federal programs ranging from food stamps to public housing to transportation infrastructure. It needs to be passed so ensure federal agencies have the resources they need.

DrRichSwier's Opinion
···
09/05/2017
Time to make America Great Again. Build the wall, cut taxes and spending. Do no raise the debt ceiling. End DACA.
Like (90)
Follow
Share
Joyce's Opinion
···
09/07/2017
You live in a border town, have a young man shot in front of your daughter at H.S., your Uncle in Agua Prieta,AZ, beat up & stolen from(he was 3rd generation rancher) by illegals and see how your mind set changes. This is what President Trump ran on, this is what Americans voted for (albeit CA the other 3rd world country I moved to from AZ)) All of you saying no not w/my tax dollars, well think of where your tax dollars would be if you had elected Hillary, certainly not staying in the U.S. maybe paying back George Soros?
Like (34)
Follow
Share
Denise's Opinion
···
09/05/2017
We are indeed a nation of laws...so why are we allowing law breakers the benefit of living in America? Are you too afraid to act?
Like (24)
Follow
Share

Argument opposed

This spending package cuts funding to many vital programs such as the EPA while providing $1.6 billion for a wasteful and unnecessary border wall. It also will destabilize health insurance markets by directing the IRS to not enforce the individual mandate.

Penny's Opinion
···
09/05/2017
Do not spend one single cent of my tax dollars on a border wall. It would be an environmental disaster. It also is a "solution" without a problem....a complete waster.
Like (657)
Follow
Share
Kevin's Opinion
···
09/05/2017
We ahould expand the EPA and just fix our immigration laws with a path to citizenship and save our good money for other needed programs, NOT A STUPID WALL!
Like (387)
Follow
Share
John's Opinion
···
09/05/2017
The border wall will NOT prevent people from entering the US. It will just take funds away from other important projects. And even more so, we should welcome people from outside the US to help build our communities.
Like (279)
Follow
Share

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house Passed September 14th, 2017
    Roll Call Vote 211 Yea / 198 Nay
      house Committees
      Committee on Appropriations
      Committee on Homeland Security
    IntroducedJuly 21st, 2017

Log in or create an account to see how your Reps voted!

What is House Bill H.R. 3354?

(Update September 14, 2017): An amendment to this bill -- known as the Make America Secure Appropriations Act -- adds the other four appropriations bills related to defense, veterans affairs, energy & water, and the legislative branch to the eight it originally included. The other four bills $788 billion bill were passed as a single piece of legislation by the House on a 235-192 vote, and combining the two spending packages into one omnibus bill it allows the Senate to consider one $1.23 trillion bill, rather than two bills. Those sections have been added at the bottom.

The eight appropriations bills originally included in this legislation would provide for $429.83 billion in spending in fiscal year 2018 by a variety of federal agencies and departments that ordinarily would get their funding from eight of the 12 appropriations bills ranging from. Agencies funded range from the the Environmental Protection Agency to Homeland Security, so check out the section-by-section breakdown below.

Labor, Health and Human Services, Education

This section would provide $156 billion in funding for the Depts. of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and other related agencies — a reduction of $5 billion from the prior year.

The Dept. of Labor would receive a total of $10.8 billion in funding for fiscal year 2018, a decrease of $1.3 billion from the previous year. Most of this funding goes to job training programs, including $8.5 billion for the Employment Training Administration, $1.69 billion for Job Corps, and $284 million for the Veterans Employment and Training Service.

The Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS) would receive a total of $77.6 billion a decrease of $542 million from the prior year and $14.5 billion above the president’s budget request. Notable programs getting funding under this section include:

  • The National Institutes of Health (NIH) would receive a total of $35.2 billion, up $1.1 billion from the prior year and $8.6 billion above the president’s budget request.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) would receive $7 billion, down $198 million from the year prior and $1 billion above the president’s budget request. The longstanding ban on the use of federal funds to advocate gun control would continue.

  • The Substance Abuse Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) would receive $3.5 billion, down $306 million from the previous year. A ban on the use of federal funds to purchase syringes or sterile needles would continue but communities can use federal funds for substance-use counseling and treatment referrals.

  • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) would receive $3.5 billion, down $219 million from the prior year and $137 million less than the president’s budget request. There would be no additional funding used to implement Obamacare programs, the “Navigators” program, and the collection of user fees from the Health Insurance Exchanges would be prohibited.

The Dept. of Education would receive $66 billion, a decrease of $2.4 billion from the prior year. Notable programs getting funding under this section include:

  • IDEA special education grants to states would total $12.2 billion, an increase of $200 million from the prior year.

  • Pell grant awards would be maintained at their current maximum award of $5,920 and of the $8.5 billion Pell surplus $3.3 billion would be rescinded.

  • Funding for charter schools would increase by $28 million to $370 million.

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting would receive advance funding of $445 million for fiscal year 2020, the same level of advance funding provided for fiscal year 2017.

Transportation, Housing & Urban Development

This section would provide $56.5 billion in appropriations for the Dept. of Transportation (DOT), the Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and related agencies — a decrease of $1.1 billion from fiscal year 2017 and $8.6 billion above the president’s budget request.

The DOT would receive $17.8 billion in funding, down $646 million from the prior year and $1.5 billion more than the president’s budget request. Of the total, $45 billion would come from the Highway Trust Fund to finance improvements to the highway system. Another $16.6 billion would go to the Federal Aviation Administration to fund air traffic control and the FAA’s NextGen air transportation systems. The Federal Transit Administration would receive $11.75 billion in funding, while the Federal Railroad Administration would get $2.2 billion.

HUD would receive $38.3 billion in appropriations, down $487 million from the prior year and $6.9 billion above the president’s budget request. Included is $27.5 billion for Public and Native Housing, while other housing programs would receive $11.9 billion in funding of which $11.1 billion would go to Project-Based Rental Assistance.

Commerce, Justice, Science

This section would authorize $54 billion for the Depts. of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and other agencies — a decrease of $2.6 billion from the year prior and $4.8 billion above the president’s budget request.

The Dept. of Justice (DOJ) would receive $29 billion, an increase of $349 million from the previous year. Of that total, $8.8 billion would go to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), $2.6 billion would go to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and $1.3 billion would go to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF). The DEA would prioritize anti-opioid and illegal drug enforcement efforts.

NASA would receive $19.9 billion for fiscal year 2018, up $219 million from the previous year. Of the total, $4.6 billion would go to exploration activities such as the development of the Orion crew vehicle and Space Launch System, and $5.9 billion would go to science programs for planetary science and astrophysics.

The Dept. of Commerce would receive $8.3 billion in funding, a decrease of $892 million from the prior year. Of the total $4.97 billion would go to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) which is a decrease of $710 million, and $3.5 billion would go to the Patent and Trademark Office which is based on fees it collects.

Other notable provisions of this section include:

  • A prohibition on the transfer or release of Guantanamo detainees in the U.S. would continue.

  • Various existing provisions related to firearms such as a ban on the implementation of the UN Arms Treaty would continue, importing shotguns, and exporting guns to Canada.

  • The DOJ would be prohibited from requiring settlement money to be donated to a third party activist group.

  • NASA and the Office of Science and Technology Policy would be prohibited from engaging in bilateral activities with China unless authorized or certified through a process outlined by the bill.

State & Foreign Operations

This section would authorize a total of $47.4 billion of discretionary and Overseas Contingency Operation (OCO) funding, a decrease of $10 billion from the prior year. OCO funding totals $12 billion and is aimed at supporting operations and assistance in conflict zones such as Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan.

The State Dept. would receive $15.4 billion in base and OCO funding, a decrease of $2.6 billion from the previous year. Of this total, $6.1 billion would go to embassy security — the same as the fiscal year 2017 — which will provide security at diplomatic facilities and implement recommendations from the Benghazi Accountability Review Board report.

International security assistance would total $8.8 billion in base and OCO funding, a decrease of $624 million from the prior year. Those funds go to international narcotics control and law enforcement activities, antiterrorism programs, nonproliferation programs, and peacekeeping operations. Antiterrorism programs that work to fight ISIS and other groups would be funded at $358 million. Security assistance to Israel would total $3.1 billion, while additional support through the Foreign Military Financing programs would go to Ukraine, Georgia, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, and Tunisia at or above current levels.

Bilateral economic assistance would total $22.7 billion, a decrease of $4.2 billion from the prior year. Programs that support development assistance, global health, and humanitarian assistance would be prioritized and $6 billion of the total would go to fighting HIV/AIDS around the globe.

Multilateral assistance would total $888 million to foreign countries and international organizations, a decrease of $1.2 billion below the prior year. No funding would go to the Green Climate Fund; international debt relief; the UN Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), or the UN Population Fund.

Other notable provisions of this section include:

  • Requiring a notification to Congress if the State Dept. commits to providing assistance to foreign governments that accept Guantanamo Bay detainees.

  • Funding to the Countering Russian influence Fund would be maintained at $105 million to Ukraine and Georgia.

  • No funding would go to the UN Human Rights Council unless the Secretary of State certifies that it would be in the national security interest and the Council stops its anti-Israel agenda and increases transparency in the elections of its members. No funds would go to UN organizations headed by countries that support terrorism, or to the UN capital master plan in New York.

  • Funding to implement the UN Arms Trade Treaty would be prohibited.

  • Financing would be allowed for coal-fired and other power generation projects by U.S. companies overseas.

  • The Mexico City Policy, which prohibits U.S. assistance to foreign nongovernmental organizations that promote or perform abortions, would be expanded to all global health programs. Similar provisions which ensure family planning programs are voluntary, ban foreign aid from being spent on abortions, and prohibit funds to groups that support coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization would be continued.

Homeland Security

This section would provide $44.3 billion in funding for the Dept. of Homeland Security (DHS) for fiscal year 2018, an increase of $1.9 billion from the prior year, and $6.8 billion for disaster relief and emergency response activities through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Within DHS, Customs and Border Protection would receive $13.8 billion in funding, up $1.6 billion from the previous year. That includes $1.6 billion for the construction of a physical barrier along the Southern border, $100 million to hire 500 new Border Patrol agents, $131 million for new border technology, and $106 million for new aircraft and sensors.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) would receive $7 billion, up $619.7 million from the prior year. That total includes $4.4 billion for detention and removal programs and operations, $2 billion for investigation programs combatting human trafficking, cybercrime, visa screening, and drug smuggling, and an additional $185.6 million to hire 1,000 additional law enforcement officers and 606 support staff.

The Coast Guard would receive $10.5 billion for fiscal year 2018, up $31.7 million from the previous year. Coast Guard personnel would receive a 2.1 percent pay increase along with the rest of the military. Of the total, $7.2 billion for operations and training and $1.3 billion for vessels, aircraft, and facilities.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) would receive $7.2 billion, down $159.8 million from the prior year. It includes full funding for Transportation Security Officers, privatized screening operations, and passenger & baggage screening equipment to speed processing and wait times for travelers. The total includes $151.8 million to hire, train, and deploy 1,047 canine teams to further expedite processing times.

FEMA’s disaster relief account would be funded at $7.3 billion to respond to natural and manmade disasters. FEMA would also have $2.7 billion in funding for various grant programs, including $690 million in firefighter assistance grants, $630 million for the Urban Area Security Initiative, $467 million for the State Homeland Security Grant Program, and $350 million for Emergency Management Performance Grants.

Other provisions of this section would include:

  • The Secret Service would receive $2 billion, $101 million less than the previous year due to the completion of the 2016 campaign cycle.

  • Customs and Immigration Services is largely funded through fees it collects, but $131 million would go to E-Verify, which is funded within CIS and helps companies ensure that their employees are eligible to work in the U.S.

Interior & Environment

This section would provide $31.4 billion in funding for the Dept. of the Interior (DOI), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Forest Service, the Indian Health Service, and other related agencies — $824 million below the fiscal year 2017 funding level and $4.3 billion above the president’s budget request.

The EPA’s budget would be $7.5 billion, down $528 million from the prior year and $1.9 billion more than the president’s request. This section also authorizes the EPA Administrator and the Secretary of the Army to withdraw the Waters of the United States rule imposed by the Obama administration.

The Forest Service would receive a total of $5.2 billion, of which $2.5 billion would be targeted toward wildland fire prevention and suppression. It and the Bureau of Land Management would be prohibited from issuing new closures of public lands to hunting and recreational shooting, except in case of public safety.

Additional funding would go to the following entities and purposes:

  • Wildland firefighting and prevention would receive $3.4 billion, which fully funds the 10-year average for annual costs to the DOI and Forest Service. That total is $334 million below fiscal year 2017.

  • The Bureaus of Indian Affairs and Education would receive $2.9 billion, up $10 million from the prior year, while the Indian Health Service budget would increase by $97 from 2017 to $5.1 billion.

  • The National Park Service would receive $2.9 billion, a decrease of $64 million from the prior year. Within the funds targeted for operations and maintenance $55 million would go to reducing the deferred maintenance backlog.

  • The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would receive $1.5 billion, a decrease of $38 million from the prior year. A one-year delay on further Endangered Species Act status reviews, determinations, and rulemakings for greater sage grouse would be continued.

  • The Bureau of Land Management would receive $1.2 billion, a decrease of $46 million from the previous year. Of that total, $68.9 million would go to on-the-ground greater sage grouse conservation and to preserve federal lands for public and private uses, such as energy development, ranching, recreation, and military training.

  • The Payments In Lieu of Taxes (PILT) program that provides funds to local governments to help offset losses in property taxes due to nontaxable federal lands within their counties would receive $465 million.

  • Funding for the Smithsonian Institution would increase by $22 million to a total of $885 million to allow for the continuation of current operations and programs. Funding for the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities would total $145 million for each endowment, a decrease of $5 million for each from the prior year.

Financial Services

This section would authorize $20.23 billion in appropriations for the Treasury Dept. the Judiciary, the Small Business Administration, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and other related agencies — a decrease of $1.28 billion from the year prior and $2.48 billion below the president’s budget request.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) would receive $11.1 billion, a decrease of $149 million from the previous year. It would be prohibited from using funds to target tax-exempt groups for scrutiny because of their ideological beliefs, or individuals for exercising their First Amendment rights, or for the production of inappropriate videos and conferences. The IRS would be prevented from enforcing the individual mandate to buy health insurance, and funds would be prohibited from being used to pay for an abortion or connected administrative expenses in connection with a multi-state qualified health plan.

Federal courts would receive $7.09 billion, up $167 million from 2017, which would cover all federal court activities, the supervision of offenders and defendants living in society, court security, and the processing of federal cases.

The District of Columbia would receive a $695 million payment from the federal government, a decrease of $60.7 million from the previous year. This funding would provide for public safety and security costs and other essential services, and includes $45 million for the Scholarships for Opportunity and Results Act (SOAR), which provides scholarships to low-income DC students so they can attend private schools. Additionally, federal and local funds would be prohibited from being used for abortion, while funding further legalization of marijuana in DC and the use of federal funds for needle exchanges would remain prohibited.

Agriculture

This section of the bill would provide $20 billion in discretionary funding for agricultural and food programs, food and medical product safety, animal and plant health programs, rural development, and nutrition programs — a decrease of $876 million from fiscal year 2017 and $4.64 billion above the president’s budget request. It would also authorize $124.9 billion in mandatory funding for food security and safety programs.

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, aka food stamps) would receive $73.6 billion in mandatory funding, which is $4.87 billion less than last year due to declining enrollment and decreases in food costs. Child nutrition programs would receive $24.28 billion in mandatory funding, an increase of $1.5 billion from the prior year. The Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program would receive $6.15 billion in discretionary funding, $200 million less than fiscal year 2017.

Other notable agencies and programs receiving funding include:

  • The Food and Drug Administration’s budget would be unchanged from fiscal year 2017 at $2.8 billion, although total funding (which includes revenue from user fees) would total $5.2 billion.

  • The Food Safety and Inspection Service would receive $1.038 billion, an increase of $6 million from the prior year.

  • Funding for rural development programs would total $2.6 billion. A variety of loan programs would also be funded, including up to $1.25 billion in loans for rural water and waste programs, $6.94 billion in loans for rural electric and telephone infrastructure, and $819 million for rural business and industry loans.

Dept. of Defense

This legislation would provide $658.1 billion for the DOD in fiscal year 2018. Of this, $584.2 billion would be discretionary funding — up $68.1 billion over the prior year — while $73.9 billion in funding would be provided for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) / Global War on Terrorism (GWOT).

The OCO/GWOT funding would provide resources needed for preparation and operations to fight ongoing threats; including personnel requirements; operational needs; replacing aircraft losses; combat vehicle safety modifications; additional Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets;and maintenance of facilities and equipment. It would also provide critical support to allies such as Israel, Ukraine, and Jordan.

Military pay would total $138.3 billion under this bill, $5.3 billion of which for OCO/GWOT requirements with the rest going to base pay. That would support 1,324,000 active-duty troops and 822,900 Guard and Reserve troops. A 2.4 percent pay raise for the military would be fully funded.

Operation and maintenance funding would total $241 billion, of which $49 billion is for OCO/GWOT requirements. Base funding would be $24.1 billion above fiscal year 2017, with the increase aimed at filling readiness shortfalls to provide troops with training and equipment.

Research and development funding would total $84.3 billion, with $1.6 billion going to OCO/GWOT requirements. Base funding would be $10.3 billion more than fiscal year 2017. That funding would support research and development of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, space security programs, the new Air Force bomber program the Ohio-class submarine replacement, Future Vertical Lift, the Israeli Cooperative Programs, and other research and development, like that done by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Equipment procurement and upgrades would total $149 billion — up $24.1 billion from the prior year — of which $16.5 billion would go to OCO/GWOT requirements. Base requirements would be $24.1 billion above fiscal year 2017. Some of the highlights include:

  • $21.5 billion for 11 Navy ships, including one carrier replacement, two guided missile destroyers, two Virginia-class submarines, and three littoral combat ships.

  • $9.5 billion would go to providing 84 F-35 aircraft; $1.8 billion for 24 F-18 Super Hornet aircraft; $1.05 billion for 56 Black Hawk helicopters.

  • $1.09 billion for the upgrade of 85 Abrams tanks, $483 million for upgrades of 145 Bradley fighting vehicles, $348 million for upgrades of 116 Strykers, and $332 million for the Israeli Cooperative Programs.

Defense health and military family programs funding would total $34 billion, up $150 million from the prior year, for the Defense Health Program to provide care for troops, military families, and retirees. Of the total, $282 million would go to cancer research, $125 million for traumatic brain injury and psychological health research, and $277 million for sexual assault prevention and response.

Some of the savings that would be gained under this bill are $1.5 billion in savings from rescinding unused prior-year funding, $1 billion from lower-than-expected fuel costs, and $345 million due to favorable economic conditions.


Military Construction & Veterans Affairs

A total of $88.8 billion in discretionary funding would be authorized by this section of the bill — $6 billion more than what was authorized for fiscal year 2017 — of which $638 million would go to Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) accounts for base construction.

The Dept. of Veterans Affairs (VA) would receive $182.3 billion in both discretionary and mandatory funding, an increase of $5.3 billion from fiscal year 2017. Discretionary funding makes up $78.3 billion of that total, up $3.9 billion from fiscal year 2017. Mandatory funding provides veteran disability compensation for 4.5 million veterans and their survivors, education benefits for 1 million veterans, and vocational rehabilitation and employment training for more than 145,000 veterans.

VA medical care would total $69 billion to treat an estimated seven million patients in fiscal year 2018. Of that, funding would be broken down as follows:

  • $8.4 billion in mental healthcare services, $186 million for suicide prevention, $316 million for traumatic brain injury treatment.

  • $7.3 billion in homeless veterans treatment, services, housing, and job training; $751 million for hepatitis C treatment; $50 million for opioid abuse prevention.

  • $250 million for rural health initiatives.

To speed up the process of reducing the VA’s disability claims backlog (about 312,000 veterans), $50 million in funding above the president’s budget request would be provided to be used on the scanning of health records and overtime pay. The bill would also continue existing reporting requirements that track each regional office’s performance on claims processing and appeals backlogs.

The VA’s electronic health record system would be modernized using $65 million set aside by this bill to use an identical electronic record system as the DOD. Major and minor construction at VA facilities would be funded at $753 million, which includes money for the construction of new facilities and the expansion of cemeteries that are reaching capacity before 2022.

Advance appropriations for fiscal year 2019 would also be provided by this bill, including $70.7 billion for veterans’ medical programs and $107.7 billion for mandatory benefit programs.

Military construction projects would receive $10.2 billion in funding, an increase of $2.1 billion above fiscal year 2017, with $638 million in OCO funding for projects in countries with ongoing U.S. operations. This would fund operational facilities, training facilities, hospitals, family housing, National Guard readiness centers, and barracks among other resources. A total of 215 military constructions projects in the U.S. and overseas would be funded.

Some of the highlights of the military construction funding include:

  • Military Family Housing: $1.4 billion to build, operate, and maintain military family housing, an increase of $131 million above fiscal year 2017, which currently serves a total of 1,388,028 military families.

  • Military Medical Facilities: $737 million for construction and alterations at new or existing military medical facilities, up $433 million from fiscal year 2017. There 9.8 million eligible beneficiaries of the care provided at these facilities.

  • DOD Education Facilities: $249 million for safety improvements and infrastructure work at four DOD Education Activities facilities in the U.S. and overseas.

  • Guard and Reserve: $575 million for construction or alteration of Guard and Reserve facilities in 22 states.

  • NATO Security Investment Program: $178 million, the same amount as fiscal year 2017, for infrastructure needed for wartime, crisis, peace support and deterrence operations, and training requirements. The funding would assist NATO’s response to challenges from Russia and threats coming from the Middle East and North Africa.

  • Guantanamo Bay: $115 million would go to building two new barracks to house service members stationed at Guantanamo Bay. The bill would also prohibit the closure of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Station and prohibit funding for any facility in the U.S. to house detainees.


Energy and Water Development

This bill would provide $37.56 billion for the Dept. of Energy (DOE), Army Corps of Engineers, and national defense nuclear weapons activities — a reduction of $209 million from the previous year and $3.24 billion above the president’s budget request for fiscal year 2018.

Funding for nuclear security would total $13.9 billion — up $976 million over last year — of which $10.2 billion would go to maintaining the military’s nuclear deterrent, $1.4 billion for naval nuclear reactors, and $1.8 billion for nuclear nonproliferation. Included in the nonproliferation funding would be $340 million to build a facility for disposing of surplus plutonium).

The Army Corps of Engineers would receive $6.16 billion for fiscal year 2018, up $120 million from the prior year and $1.16 billion more than the president’s budget request. Of the total, $2.8 billion would go to navigation projects and studies, while $1.8 billion would fund flood and storm damage reduction activities.

Energy programs within the DOE would receive $9.6 billion in funding, a decrease of $1.7 billion from the prior year and $2.3 billion above the president’s budget request. Research and development related to coal, natural gas, oil, and other fossil fuels would be funded with $635 million, down $33 million from the prior year. Nuclear energy research would receive $969 million, a reduction of $48 million from fiscal year 2017. Renewable energy programs would be cut by $986 million from the previous year at a level $468 million higher than the president’s budget.

Other provisions that would be funded under this section include:

  • Science research would receive $5.4 billion in funding, the same amount as fiscal year 2017, which would be focused on next generation energy sources and high-performance computing systems.

  • The Bureau of Reclamation would receive $1.24 billion for managing, developing, and protecting water resources in western states.

  • The Yucca Mountain nuclear repository would be supported with $90 million for its Nuclear Waste Disposal program, $30 million for Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal, and $30 million for the continued adjudication fo DOE’s Yucca Mountain License application.

Other policy items that would be enacted under this section include:

  • The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Secretary of the Army would be authorized to withdraw the Waters of the United States rule.

  • The Clean Water Act’s application would be restricted in certain agricultural areas, such as farm ponds and irrigation ditches.

  • The possession of firearms on Corps of Engineers lands would be permitted.

  • New nuclear nonproliferation projects in Russia would be prohibited without notifications from the Secretary of Energy.


Legislative Branch

This bill would provide $3.58 billion for the House and joint operations of Congress (excluding Senate-only items) for fiscal year 2018, $100 million more than 2017 but $228 million less than the president’s request.

House operations would be funded with $1.194 billion for the pay of members and their staffs, leadership, committees, and Officers of the House — $5 million more than last year to enhance security for members when they’re away from the Capitol complex and cybersecurity enhancements. Pay would remain frozen for members Congress, as it has been since 2010.

Capitol Police would be funded at $422.5 million, an increase of $29.2 from the prior year, which provides for the security of members, staff, and visitors of the Capitol. The increase would fund additional training, equipment, and technology-related support.

Among the other items funded by this section are:

  • Architect of the Capitol: $577.8 million would be provided, an increase of $48.4 million from the year prior to fund health and safety improvement projects to protect members, staff, and visitors.

  • Library of Congress: $648 million would be provided, an increase of $16 million from the prior year that would fund information technology modernization within the Library, the Copyright Office, and the Congressional Research Service (CRS). The public would have access to all non-confidential CRS reports.

  • Government Accountability office (GAO): $568 million would be provided, $450 thousand above the prior year to continue the GAO’s work of providing Congress with accurate, nonpartisan reporting of federal programs and tracking of how taxpayer dollars are spent

Impact

Taxpayers and beneficiaries of relevant federal programs; and covered federal agencies.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 3354

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-DepthThis legislation contains the eight individual appropriations bills that weren’t included in the “minibus” spending package passed by the House on July 27, 2017 that contained the other four appropriations bills. The federal government is funded through the 2017 fiscal year, which ends on September 30, 2017 and this bill, plus the Make America Secure Appropriations Act would fund the government beyond that date.

The White House released a statement of administration policy expressing support for this legislation, and stated that the president would sign this bill into law.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: uschools / iStock)

AKA

Department of Homeland Security Border Infrastructure Construction Appropriations Act, 2018

Official Title

Making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018, and for other purposes.

    Time to make America Great Again. Build the wall, cut taxes and spending. Do no raise the debt ceiling. End DACA.
    Like (90)
    Follow
    Share
    Do not spend one single cent of my tax dollars on a border wall. It would be an environmental disaster. It also is a "solution" without a problem....a complete waster.
    Like (657)
    Follow
    Share
    We ahould expand the EPA and just fix our immigration laws with a path to citizenship and save our good money for other needed programs, NOT A STUPID WALL!
    Like (387)
    Follow
    Share
    The border wall will NOT prevent people from entering the US. It will just take funds away from other important projects. And even more so, we should welcome people from outside the US to help build our communities.
    Like (279)
    Follow
    Share
    This wall was a promise from a man I didn't vote for, to be paid by a people he promised wouldn't pay for it, and will add nothing but trouble for this country's economy and relationship with Mexico
    Like (192)
    Follow
    Share
    Please don't vote for any funding for the border wall. We need to focus on education, infrastructure, climate science, etc. All of those vital things are receiving cuts with this bill. I also think reducing funding for WIC and Medicare/Medicaid is cruel. This bill makes America decidedly "not great."
    Like (133)
    Follow
    Share
    Don't waste my tax dollars on a WALL. Protect us by keeping the EPA. We need an agency that protects our drinking water, the air we breath and the soil our food grows in. Also keeping the ACA.
    Like (109)
    Follow
    Share
    Spending tax dollars on a boarder wall is wasteful and unnecessary. Those tax dollars should be used to rebuild Houston, repair our bridges and roads, support a better rail system, fund the ACA, improve our public education system, etc.
    Like (72)
    Follow
    Share
    While many parts of this legislation are positive, these appropriations bills should not be lumped together. We need to separate them out and have individual debate and voting processes - as it stands, one must either accept the bad with the good or say no to everything good to avoid the bad. Separate bills would be much more effective at creating ideal legislation.
    Like (67)
    Follow
    Share
    Not a dime goes to this idiotic wall.
    Like (55)
    Follow
    Share
    Do not spend one dollar of my taxes on an insane border wall! Fund the EPA!
    Like (54)
    Follow
    Share
    Simply absurd waste of taxpayer dollars.
    Like (54)
    Follow
    Share
    No tax dollars should be used for this wall. The president promised a wall that would not be paid for by the citizens of the USA. If it can't be paid for without tax dollar, there should be no wall.
    Like (50)
    Follow
    Share
    No wall. No cuts to program funding. More money to programs. Money for Texas relief needs to be a separate bill.
    Like (46)
    Follow
    Share
    No wall, no way - if you can pardon the criminal Arpaio, you can grandfather the Dreamers.
    Like (41)
    Follow
    Share
    The wall is a boondoggle. Real people are suffering in the country that funding the wall will only exacerbate.
    Like (40)
    Follow
    Share
    NO BORDER WALL
    Like (40)
    Follow
    Share
    Do not allow this man to spend one penny of our tax dollars. He has already appropriated far too many of our tax dollars. With billions of dollars being spent on a wall, we know that Trump would get kickbacks in the millions or billions.
    Like (37)
    Follow
    Share
    most immigrants come in by plane...also why is there so much emphasis on Mexican immigrants when the whole US is filled with people from around the world who are not in good status with their visas. Funding for a new wall is going to be a waste, no...massive waste of money.
    Like (34)
    Follow
    Share
    Even if I agreed with the ideas behind a border wall (which I don't), a literal border wall is not the way to accomplish this sort of security. This project is a shameful wate of resources and money.
    Like (34)
    Follow
    Share
    MORE