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bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house has not voted
      house Committees
      House Committee on Energy and Commerce
      Health
    IntroducedJune 26th, 2009

Bill Details

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Title

Healthy Hospitals Act of 2009

Official Title

To require public reporting of health care-associated infections data by hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers, and for other purposes.

Summary

Healthy Hospitals Act of 2009 - Amends the Public Health Service Act to require a hospital or ambulatory surgical center (hospital), in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reporting protocols of the National Healthcare Safety Network, to report to the Network data on each health care-associated infection occurring in the hospital and patient demographic information that may affect such data. Requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services to promptly post data reported on the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) public Internet site in a manner that promotes the comparison of data on each health care-associated infection: (1) among hospitals; and (2) by patient demographic information. Directs the Secretary, for each year for which such data is reported, to submit to Congress a report that summarizes: (1) the number and types of health care-associated infections reported in hospitals; (2) factors that contribute to the occurrence of such infections; (3) the number of certified infection control professionals on staff; (4) the total increases or decreases in health care costs that resulted from changes in infection rates; and (5) recommendations for best practices to eliminate such infections. Authorizes the Secretary to impose a civil penalty of up to $5,000 for each knowing violation of the reporting requirement by a hospital. Expresses the sense of Congress that health care providers and facilities should take measures to reduce the rate of occurrence of health care-associated infections to zero.