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house Bill H.R. 2480

Should the Feds Fund Efforts to Prevent Opioid-Related Child Mistreatment?

Argument in favor

The opioid epidemic has devastated families, causing cases of child maltreatment to spike in recent years. It’s important that the federal government funds programs to ensure children aren’t harmed due to their parents’ or caregivers’ addiction.

Trent's Opinion
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05/19/2019
Yes. Helping children .. or not helping children. Seems easy.
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Tess's Opinion
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05/19/2019
Of course-as long as we are proclaiming pro-life platitudes-this is paramount.
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SneakyPete's Opinion
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05/20/2019
Stronger Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (Stronger CAPTA) I’m in strong support of and recommend the passage of the House Bill H.R. 2480 AKA the “Stronger Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (Stronger CAPTA)” which would seek to strengthen the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) to combat rising rates of child maltreatment due to the opioid crisis. This bill would provide strategic funding to build networks of prevention services to strengthen families to improve child protective services’ quality. The opioid epidemic has devastated families, causing cases of child maltreatment to spike in recent years. It’s important that the federal government funds programs to ensure children aren’t harmed due to their parents’ or caregivers’ addiction. SneakyPete..... 👍🏻👍🏻HR.2480👍🏻👍🏻. 5.20.19.....
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Argument opposed

While it’s important to keep children from being harmed by their parents’ or caregivers’ opioid addictions, it’s also equally — if even more — important to address the opioid epidemic’s root causes. This bill only addresses a symptom of the opioid epidemic.

Kodiwodi's Opinion
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05/19/2019
I appreciate the effort to try to reduce the abuse of children by their drugged out parents but I would be willing to bet there are just as many being abused by alcoholics or parents who are overwhelmed and never learned to parent. I would much prefer that monies go directly to Child Protective Services for the hiring and retention of caseworkers so that we might never again hear a story of how a child died because no one had checked on him/her in six months because they were short handed or didn’t think it was that bad. Using money for a symptom and not a cure is a poor investment and a waste of time helping only a limited number and class of children.
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burrkitty's Opinion
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05/19/2019
Like putting a bandaid on a bullet wound. Address the actual issue of addiction as a public health crisis and hire more caseworkers for Child Protective Services. This is not a issue that can be solved with platitudes. Put in some effort to make sure the laws have teeth, the services have funding and employees, and the treatment of addiction is at the forefront.
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I.Got.an.Idea...'s Opinion
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05/19/2019
We should provide more funding to Social Services departments and Child advocate agencies. Funds should be provided for all children of abuse or maltreatment, regardless of whether it is opioid-induced or other.
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bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions
  • The house has not voted
      house Committees
      Committee on Education and Labor
    IntroducedMay 2nd, 2019

What is House Bill H.R. 2480?

This bill — the Stronger Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (Stronger CAPTA) — would seek to strengthen the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) to combat rising rates of child maltreatment due to the opioid crisis. This bill would provide strategic funding to build networks of prevention services to strengthen families to improve child protective services’ quality.

It’d also authorize $270 million for the expansion of prevention services to reach over three million children annually, as well as another $270 million to foster new research and support state child protective services agencies in expanding services to meet increased demand  without sacrificing quality.

This bill would also establish uniform standards for counting child fatalities and near-fatalities related to child maltreatment. It’d also create an electronic system allowing states to share data from their child abuse and neglect registries with other states.

Additionally, this bill would:

  • Support the development of strategies and best practices for reducing rates of child abuse and neglect linked to parent substance use disorder;
  • Address racial bias across the child welfare system and ensure that prevention services are accessible to all families;
  • Strengthen and expand intrastate coordination among agencies serving vulnerable families at risk of child abuse and neglect to ensure such families have access to physical and mental health services, domestic violence prevention programs, disability supports, and substance use treatment when necessary;
  • Educate child welfare professionals and paraprofessionals on practices and strategies that effectively treat and prevent child abuse and neglect;
  • Provide funding for research and technical assistance activities aimed at enhancing providers’ and administrators’ knowledge of effective child abuse and neglect prevention and treatment strategies; and
  • Increase prevention funding for tribal organizations and migrant programs.

Impact

The opioid epidemic; child abuse and maltreatment victims; child abuse and maltreatment prevention organizations; domestic violence prevention programs; child welfare professionals and paraprofessionals; child welfare research; tribal organizations; migrant programs; and inter-state sharing of child abuse data.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 2480

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-DepthRep. Kim Schrier (D-WA) introduced this bill to combat the rising rates of child maltreatment experienced as the opioid crisis has devastated families and communities across the country:

“One death of a child is one too many. As a pediatrician, I am trained to identify potential instances of child abuse and neglect. Too often we react to child abuse instead of doing everything we can to prevent it. It is long past time to help children before they are abused. That is why I’m proud to introduce CAPTA, which will provide resources to families and states to help prevent child abuse and neglect, including for children affected by the opioid crisis.”

Original cosponsor Rep. James Comer (R-KY, Civil Rights and Human Services Subcommittee Ranking Member, believes this bill will be one of the five most important pieces of legislation to come out of Congress this year. He adds:

“I'm proud to be the lead Republican sponsor of this reauthorization of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA), which provides states and community organizations with the tools and resources they need to provide evidence-based, prevention-focused services for our nation’s children and families. The safety and security of some of our most vulnerable members of society – our nation’s children – is of the utmost importance and requires this committee's full attention.”

Susan Dreyfus, president and CEO of the Alliance for Strong Families and Communities, a national association of nonprofit providers in social services, says the connection between the opioid epidemic and child maltreatment is playing out across the country. She says, “I move all around the country, and I cannot think of a single state where this is not becoming a growing issue in their child welfare system.”

However, Dreyfus adds, it’s imperative to address the opioid epidemic’s root causes:

“We’ve got to get underneath the true causes of [opioid addiction], which are really steeped in people’s lack of coping skills, their own health, well-being and sense of hopefulness in their lives. I think people are self-medicating with opioids and we’ve got to understand why. If we think we’re going to solve the opioid epidemic by simply increasing access to treatment, we will be forever perplexed by the dilemma.”

This bill passed the House Education & Labor Committee on a voice vote and has seven bipartisan cosponsors, including four Republicans and three Democrats.


Of NoteFollowing significant declines in child abuse and neglect rates through the 1990s and 2000s, the child maltreatment rate has climbed in recent years due to the opioid epidemic, which has devastated families and communities across the country. Thus, 676,000 children were victims of abuse and neglect in 2016.

In a March 2018 research brief, the Dept. of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation found that nationally, rates of drug overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations have a statistical relationship with child welfare caseloads, including rates of child protective services reports, substantiated reports, and foster care placements. The HHS report also found that higher indicators of substance use correspond to more complex and severe child welfare cases.

The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) is the key piece of federal legislation addressing child abuse and neglect. It provides federal funding to states to support child abuse prevention, assessment, investigation, prosecution, and treatment activities. It also provides grants to public agencies and nonprofits, including Native American tribes and tribal organizations, for demonstration programs and projects to prevent and address child maltreatment.


Media:

Summary by Lorelei Yang

(Photo Credit: iStockphoto.com / Imgorthand)

AKA

Stronger Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act

Official Title

To reauthorize the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, and for other purposes.

    Yes. Helping children .. or not helping children. Seems easy.
    Like (11)
    Follow
    Share
    I appreciate the effort to try to reduce the abuse of children by their drugged out parents but I would be willing to bet there are just as many being abused by alcoholics or parents who are overwhelmed and never learned to parent. I would much prefer that monies go directly to Child Protective Services for the hiring and retention of caseworkers so that we might never again hear a story of how a child died because no one had checked on him/her in six months because they were short handed or didn’t think it was that bad. Using money for a symptom and not a cure is a poor investment and a waste of time helping only a limited number and class of children.
    Like (57)
    Follow
    Share
    Like putting a bandaid on a bullet wound. Address the actual issue of addiction as a public health crisis and hire more caseworkers for Child Protective Services. This is not a issue that can be solved with platitudes. Put in some effort to make sure the laws have teeth, the services have funding and employees, and the treatment of addiction is at the forefront.
    Like (37)
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    Share
    We certainly need to put more funding into child protective services, but why focus on child maltreatment from opioid-related abuse? All children need to be protected from abuse no matter what the reason! There also needs to be more funding for mental health services as well. People who abuse opioids are often self-medicating due to serious mental health issues.
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    Of course-as long as we are proclaiming pro-life platitudes-this is paramount.
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    I completely agree that a complete overhaul and complete re-funding of children’s services should be priority, but using the opioid crisis to fund by using scare tactics fueled my misinformation is the worst way to accomplish it. Yes there is a crisis of illegal drugs leading to ODs but what the ‘leaders’ and media are claiming is far from the truth. Why focus on mistreatment of children only when parents use opioids, there are less than 2 million addicted to opioids with 20 million addicted to other substances. Why do children who’s parents use cocaine or abuse alcohol daily not deserve to be highlighted and protected!
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    We should provide more funding to Social Services departments and Child advocate agencies. Funds should be provided for all children of abuse or maltreatment, regardless of whether it is opioid-induced or other.
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    I believe the children are our are future Teach them well and let them lead the way Show them all the beauty they possess inside Give them a sense of pride to make it easier Let the children's laughter remind us how we used to be Everybody searching for a hero People need someone to look up to I never found anyone who fulfill my needs A lonely place to be And so I learned to depend on me I decided long ago Never to walk in anyone's shadows If I fail, if I succeed At least I'll live as I believe No matter what they take from me They can't take away my dignity Because the greatest Love of all is happening to me I found the greatest Love of all inside of me The greatest love of all Is easy to achieve Learning to love yourself It is the greatest love of all - Whitney
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    Stronger Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (Stronger CAPTA) I’m in strong support of and recommend the passage of the House Bill H.R. 2480 AKA the “Stronger Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (Stronger CAPTA)” which would seek to strengthen the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) to combat rising rates of child maltreatment due to the opioid crisis. This bill would provide strategic funding to build networks of prevention services to strengthen families to improve child protective services’ quality. The opioid epidemic has devastated families, causing cases of child maltreatment to spike in recent years. It’s important that the federal government funds programs to ensure children aren’t harmed due to their parents’ or caregivers’ addiction. SneakyPete..... 👍🏻👍🏻HR.2480👍🏻👍🏻. 5.20.19.....
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    I’m off the opinion that states can do a better job on most things and issues. Give the monies to the states and let them put it where needed for opioid abuse. #MAGA
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    Big pharmaceutical companies are to blame. Make them pay like tobacco companies have to.
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    Just another do nothing constructive, but "sounds" good bill introduced by a democrat. STOP wasting money on shill bills that do nothing to actually help anyone, but sound really cool to the voters who are apathetic at best. If you really want to help children, then do something about the causes of the opioid addiction problem and stop attempting to put band-aids on the injuries caused by it.
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    No! Not constitutional! The federal government does not get authority to act just because something sad or bad happens or could happen. Leave it to the state and local governments, if you are going to involve bureaucrats at all. Private charities are the way to go. They are more efficient and effective at solving problems.
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    Our government is laser focused on singling out "opioid" abuse and addiction. Why isn't anyone attempting to help people affected by the plethora of substances which have been misused and abused for hundreds of years including alcohol, sugar, nicotine, cocaine, marijuana, speed, lsd, angel dust, hashish, just to name a few? People who suffer from addiction will abuse WHATEVER substance they can get their hands on, or engage in addictive or behavior (gambling, sex, crime, etc.) The CRISIS du jour happens to be opioids at the moment, but as the circle of life evolves, it will swing towards another "fad".... the war on drugs has been an abysmal failure since it's inception, but our government hasn't learned from these mistakes and apparently never will....so more innocent people will die, children will suffer, and NOTHING will change. The time tested trickle down effect will catch up with today's "crisis" in about 10 years, but by then the damage will already have been done, and will be irreversible.
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    Child abuse is already illegal. Let’s stop creating 15?layers to a crime because that is the only thing congress can agree on! Also would be a good idea not to force women to have babies they don’t want and aren’t prepared for.
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    Stay out of health care! the more the government gets involved the worse things get
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    Children are our future. They need to be protected at all costs. Although the GOP only thinks they are important when in the uterus, thinking and feeling individuals think they are important even after birth. We are the right to lifers, not just the need to birthers
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    Helping children should be the only issue. I sure hope that they don’t treat children differently depending upon the cause of their problem.
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    I am voting yea but only because it would appear that we are not able to walk and chew gum. A special bill to assist children whose parents are addicts seems a little narrow. And I'm going to make a stab in the dark here by saying that it will be the parents/caregivers who get nailed. The actual offenders will get off with a slap on the wrist. Read the papers about how molesters and rapists are actually sentenced. We need to deal with the root causes of addiction and child abuse.
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    The feds could both save taxpayer money and reduce opioid problems of all types by ending the failed war on drugs.
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