Like Countable?

Install the App
TRY NOW

house Bill H.R. 2061

Exempting People Who Only Rely on Religious Healing From ACA Health Care

Argument in favor

People who adhere to a faith that rejects medical treatment on religious grounds should not be compelled to buy health insurance that they would never use.

···
09/28/2015
The parent argument that leads to this argument is already broken. Forcing substandard government backed healthcare is un-American and communistic in nature. I am appalled we are here already and further bothered that it had lead to this type of exemption disagreement. What a mess.
Like (11)
Follow
Share
BTSundra's Opinion
···
12/16/2015
We should preserve religions, and repeal the ACA. This knocks out both those points.
Like (9)
Follow
Share
operaman's Opinion
···
09/28/2015
Yes, exempt everybody from Obamacare. This will give religious groups freedom as stated in the Constitution.
Like (8)
Follow
Share

Argument opposed

Whether a person will use their health insurance is irrelevant, the Affordable Care Act requires Americans to get and maintain coverage.

bart's Opinion
···
09/29/2015
This is absurd (also hilarious). Regardless of how you feel about the ACA - this clearly undermines it. Anyone could conceivably make this claim and thus be exempted - which makes it an amazing and creative piece of legislation. Unless, of course, anyone making this claim cannot have ANY health insurance whatsoever, in which case I approve!
Like (48)
Follow
Share
BananaNeil's Opinion
···
09/29/2015
There is no science in religious healing. The government is offering to support your medical bills, I don't understand why this is difficult.
Like (12)
Follow
Share
Kyle's Opinion
···
09/28/2015
I vote against because regardless of their religion, there is a high probability that they will eventually seek some sort of medical care at some point during their lifetime. Taxpayers shouldn't be forced to pay for their treatment and medical professionals cannot turn them away if it is life-threatening.
Like (12)
Follow
Share

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Finance
  • The house Passed September 28th, 2015
    Passed by Voice Vote
      house Committees
      Committee on Ways and Means
    IntroducedApril 28th, 2015

Log in or create an account to see how your Reps voted!

What is House Bill H.R. 2061?

This bill would expand the religious conscience exemption within the Affordable Care Act to exempt people who rely only on a religious method of healing, as receiving medical services is inconsistent with their religious beliefs. They would be exempt from the mandate to purchase and maintain minimum essential health care coverage.

There are two major Christian denominations that object to conventional medical treatment — Jehovah’s Witnesses and Christian Scientists. They are currently required to purchase health insurance by the individual mandate of the Affordable Care Act.

Impact

People who practice a faith that rejects medical treatment, and the federal government.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 2061

The CBO estimates that this bill would reduce revenues by $1.9 million over the 2016-2025 period.

More Information

In-Depth: The Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI), expressed support for broadening the exemption, saying:
“Right now, to qualify, you have to believe, as a matter of faith, in giving up any private or public insurance — including Social Security. That includes the Amish, the Old Order Mennonites and that’s about it. That is way too strict.”

This bill currently has the bipartisan support of 172 cosponsors, including 106 Republicans and 66 Democrats.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell
(Photo C
redit: "Tiffany Education (center)". Licensed under Public Domain via Commons)

AKA

EACH Act

Official Title

To amend section 5000A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide an additional religious exemption from the individual health coverage mandate, and for other purposes.

    The parent argument that leads to this argument is already broken. Forcing substandard government backed healthcare is un-American and communistic in nature. I am appalled we are here already and further bothered that it had lead to this type of exemption disagreement. What a mess.
    Like (11)
    Follow
    Share
    This is absurd (also hilarious). Regardless of how you feel about the ACA - this clearly undermines it. Anyone could conceivably make this claim and thus be exempted - which makes it an amazing and creative piece of legislation. Unless, of course, anyone making this claim cannot have ANY health insurance whatsoever, in which case I approve!
    Like (48)
    Follow
    Share
    There is no science in religious healing. The government is offering to support your medical bills, I don't understand why this is difficult.
    Like (12)
    Follow
    Share
    I vote against because regardless of their religion, there is a high probability that they will eventually seek some sort of medical care at some point during their lifetime. Taxpayers shouldn't be forced to pay for their treatment and medical professionals cannot turn them away if it is life-threatening.
    Like (12)
    Follow
    Share
    We should preserve religions, and repeal the ACA. This knocks out both those points.
    Like (9)
    Follow
    Share
    Yes, exempt everybody from Obamacare. This will give religious groups freedom as stated in the Constitution.
    Like (8)
    Follow
    Share
    Although I fell that it's really stupid for someone to rely on religion for physical healing, I do not think anyone, regardless of faith, should be forced to buy something they don't want. I can't understand why someone wouldn't want to buy it, but if someone genuinely feels they don't need it, then good for them.
    Like (5)
    Follow
    Share
    When you people write legislation like this, do you realize how ignorant you sound? Any idea? Now, I'm aware you guys don't rely on logic (if you did, your party platform would look substantially different) but don't you guys care at all that the rest of the civilized world laughs at you with derision? Or does the donor money erase any shame?
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    I don't like that everyone is required to have healthcare, but if they are, especially those stupid enough to believe in religious healing should have to.
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    No one should be forced to buy insurance. By setting this precedent they can force people to buy almost anything.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    What happens if they change their mind and want treatment . I cases of serious medical conditions people frequently change their mind
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    Exempting these people will create an unnecessary burden on the Healthcare system.
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    Religious freedom is always relative to the Common Good.
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    We should get rid of Obamacare altogether.
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    The bill must also include an exemption for health care profession and institutions from treating those requesting an exemption for it to be meaningful.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    religion doesn't cure things doctors do
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Evidence-based medicine is factual whether you believe in it or not.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    This is a ridiculous notion and the fact that it's even in our house of lawmakers is beyond comprehension. Not only are people who rely exclusively on faith to heal their ailments astoundingly stupid, but that we're even entertaining exempting them from our attempt (feeble though it may be) at universal healthcare is, frankly, careless.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Healthy people also won't use it so the religious argument falls down.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    If people want to die. Let them.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    MORE