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house Bill H.R. 205

Should Offshore Drilling be Banned Off Florida’s Coast?

Argument in favor

Offshore drilling off its coast would threaten Florida’s tourism and fishing industries as well as the state’s environment and U.S. military readiness. A permanent ban on offshore drilling off the Florida coast is the only way to protect the state and the U.S. from these potential impacts.

burrkitty's Opinion
···
09/11/2019
Off shore drilling should be banned in all USA waters. Energy independence and security are better accomplished by RENEWABLE ENERGY. Which, by the way, will create MORE jobs, MORE economic development, and MORE national security than fossils fuel ever can. So. The first point is that there are a huge number of people employed in renewable energy jobs globally. There are almost 10 million of them around the world. Slightly over 3 million are employed in solar power. Large hydropower employs about 1.5 million people, and 1.2 million are in wind power employment. Advanced energy — which includes solar, wind, energy efficiency, energy storage and EVs — contributed $1.4 trillion to the global economy in 2016. (The US portion of this amount was $200 billion.) In the US, 45 has whinged on about the importance of coal jobs, but they actually aren’t all that significant when put in context. The US coal industry only employs about 76,000 workers, which is less than many industries. For example, used car dealerships have a total of about 138,000 workers, casinos employ about 99,000 people, as do travel agencies. Museums, radio stations, and breweries and wineries all have more workers than coal does. In fact, over 260,000 Americans are employed by the solar power industry, and that total blows away the number of coal jobs — it’s well over three times more! Imagine if strong solar power industries were stimulated in West Virginia and Ohio. Easily beating coal again is the wind power industry, with over 100,000 jobs. Also, NREL published an article in 2017 stating that wind power technician was the fastest growing job in the country. Funny how Trump doesn’t mention that, and actually has a history of complaining about wind power and suing to try to block wind farms. Another high-demand cleantech job is solar PV installer. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median pay for PV installers is about $39,000/yr. For the wind power service tech job, it is $52,000. Would you rather work outdoors in unpolluted air or in a coal mine breathing coal dust which may cause you to die prematurely? You might have noticed how dismal coal’s future looks and how bright it is for wind power. “To achieve 20% wind power by 2030, the U.S. Department of Energy estimates that the United States will require more than 100,000 additional wind turbines, creating more than 500,000 new jobs.” What was that … potentially 500,000 new wind power jobs? What coal jobs? They could retrain the whole coal industry and still need more than FOUR HUNDRED THOUSAND MORE PEOPLE. So, if that estimate is accurate, there would be over 600,000 jobs in wind power just in the US. That figure might sound kind of nuts, but it has been referenced many times. “According to the Wind Vision Report, wind has the potential to support more than 600,000 jobs in manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and supporting services by 2050.” At the state level, the numbers look promising too, Texas alone may have 31,500 wind power jobs by 2020, Colorado could have 22,000, and Iowa about 17,000. Another benefit is that wind turbines can be installed in rural areas at existing farms to provide much-needed income to local people. Here’s another fascinating example: “The report looked at the 23 largest wind farms in Illinois, finding that they will add almost $6 billion to local economies over their lifetimes and have resulted in the creation of more than 19,000 jobs during the construction periods. The projects will also support 814 permanent jobs in the state.” The Union of Concerned Scientists made a great point in one its recent articles on renewable energy: “Compared with fossil fuel technologies, which are typically mechanized and capital-intensive, the renewable energy industry is more labor intensive. Solar panels need humans to install them; wind farms need technicians for maintenance. This means that, on average, more jobs are created for each unit of electricity generated from renewable sources than from fossil fuels.” That is true even when wind and solar power are cheaper for the customer. An NREL document backed up this insight as well. “There are two main reasons why renewable energy technologies offer an economic advantage: (1) they are labor intensive, so they generally create more jobs per dollar invested than conventional electricity generation technologies, and (2) they use primarily indigenous resources, so most of the energy dollars can be kept at home.” So, renewable energy can generate better jobs and more of them. Of course, renewable energy contributes more economically than only jobs and pollution reduction. An IRENA report includes a reference to how stimulating renewable energy investment can be. “Doubling the share of renewables in the global energy mix by 2030 would increase global GDP by up to 1.1% or USD 1.3 trillion. The report shows that such a transition increases global GDP in 2030 between 0.6% and 1.1%, or between around USD 700 billion and USD 1.3 trillion compared to business as usual.” Another key, and very striking, benefit is how renewable energy investment can impact trade. “For fossil fuel importers, the switch to a greater share of renewables has potentially favourable trade implications. Reducing fuel imports can improve trade balance and improve GDP. The EU33 improves its net exports by USD 15 billion when the renewables share is doubled and by USD 21 billion in the higher electrification case.” According to an analysis conducted by the Union of Concerned Scientists, implementing a national 25% by 2025 renewable electric standard would result in the following benefits: “$263.4 billion in new capital investment for RE technologies, $13.5 billion in new landowner income from biomass production and/or wind land lease payments, and $11.5 billion in new property tax revenue for local communities. A single program created by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was very stimulating to the US national economy (at a critical time). “NREL’s analysis estimates that up to 75,000 direct and indirect jobs and up to $44 billion in total economic output were supported by the design, manufacturing, construction, and installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind projects funded by the #1603 Treasury grant program. In addition, the study estimates that the operation and maintenance of these solar and wind facilities will continue to sustain up to $1.8 billion per year in economic output over the lifetime of the facilities (20–30 years).” Wind power has contributed greatly to the US economy in just in the last dozen years or so. “Since 2005, American wind power has attracted more than $100 billion in new investment. At the current rate, the wind industry is investing between $10 billion and $20 billion per year in the U.S. economy.” Another key point is the amount of manufacturing that takes place here in America. “Now, more than 50% of a U.S.-installed turbine’s value is produced in America, a twelve-fold increase from just a few years ago. Some turbine manufacturers plan to make 100% of their components in America, and the trend is expected to continue.” Currently, wind power contributes about $20 billion a year in value to the US economy, and it has been projected that amount will rise to $24 billion by 2020. Wind power is more stable than fossil fuels in this regard. “Because the electricity from wind farms is sold at a fixed price over a long period of time (e.g. 20+ years) and its fuel is free, wind energy mitigates the price uncertainty that fuel costs add to traditional sources of energy.” The Solar Foundation also released a report containing an astonishing figure — “the U.S. solar industry added $154 billion in economic output in 2016.” Researchers at UC Berkeley studied the climate and health benefits of solar and wind power in the US and came up with equally huge benefits. “The climate benefit estimates ranged from $5 billion to $106 billion, with an additional $30 billion to $113 billion in air quality and public health benefits. And that’s just the estimated economic benefits of the averted 3,000 to 12,000 premature deaths—it doesn’t count things like sub-lethal medical issues and lost productivity, much less the personal benefits to individual lives.” On the low end, the combined values are $35 billion in benefits. At the top, it has the number at $219 billion. And I’ve only talked about money. I haven’t talked about climate change at all. So once again sneakyPete, YOU ARE WRONG and you’re wrongness is abundantly and obviously provable. It’s amazing how science and facts work.
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Sandra 's Opinion
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09/11/2019
All offshore drilling needs to be banned. Period. Protect our oceans!!!
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Mildred's Opinion
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09/11/2019
Offshore drilling should not be allowed on any United States coast, not just Florida.
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Argument opposed

Offshore drilling off the entire U.S. coastline, including off Florida’s coastline, is needed to ensure U.S. energy independence. Expanding offshore drilling will also create jobs, spur economic growth, and boost national security.

SneakyPete's Opinion
···
09/09/2019
Come On Democrats, Don’t Let The Environmentalist Run You Offshore drilling off the entire U.S. coastline, including off Florida’s coastline, is needed to ensure U.S. energy independence. Expanding offshore drilling will also create jobs, spur economic growth, and boost national security. SneakyPete..... 😾😾😾😾😾. M9.8.19.....
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Guy's Opinion
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09/11/2019
Just be sure to start in front of Mara lago.
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JTJ's Opinion
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09/11/2019
No, energy independence is crucial to our security.
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bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
  • The house Passed September 11th, 2019
    Roll Call Vote 248 Yea / 180 Nay
      house Committees
      Committee on Natural Resources
      Energy and Mineral Resources
    IntroducedJanuary 3rd, 2019

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What is House Bill H.R. 205?

This bill — the Protecting and Securing Florida’s Coastline Act of 2019 — would permanently extend the moratorium on oil and gas leasing, preleasing, and related activities in areas of the Gulf of Mexico that are within 125 miles of the Florida Coast and most of the eastern Gulf of Mexico. This would have the effect of banning offshore drilling off the Florida coast.

Impact

Gulf of Mexico; offshore drilling off the Florida coast; offshore drilling in the eastern Gulf of Mexico; and Florida.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 205

$100.00 Million
The CBO estimates that this bill would cost $100 million over the 2019-2024 period and $400 million over the 2019-2029 period. Costs would primarily stem from reduced collections of offsetting receipts from offshore oil and gas leases and reduced spending related to leasing in the affected regions.

More Information

In-Depth: Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL) introduced this bill to ban drilling off the Florida coast. When he introduced another bill on this same issue, he argued that banning drilling off the Florida coast is needed to protect the environment, tourism, and military readiness

“Water quality impacts all of Florida’s residents and visitors. I want to ensure that all areas east of the Military Mission Line in the Gulf of Mexico are permanently protected from offshore oil drilling. In 2022, the moratorium on drilling and exploration will expire. Offshore drilling will negatively affect our environment, tourism, and military readiness. I am fighting to protect our Florida coast for future generations to enjoy - Florida’s economy is dependent on clean water and a healthy environment.” 

Testifying before the House Rules Committee on this bill, Rep. Rooney expounded upon the need for an offshore drilling ban to protect military readiness,  tourism, and the environment

“The Eastern Gulf is home to the Gulf Test Range, a 120,000 square mile range that stretches from the Florida panhandle to Key West. This unimpeded training and testing area is of critical importance to our military now and will become even more important in the future, as hypersonic and drone testing increase. Our military has no better location to carry out these exercises and there is no compelling reason to place drilling interests ahead of military necessities. The proximity to major military bases and its large scale make the Eastern Gulf of Mexico area a unique asset for national defense that cannot be replicated… Additionally, Florida’s tourism economy faces an existential threat from offshore drilling,” the Southwest Florida Republican insisted. “Deepwater Horizon may be the most infamous recent Gulf oil spill but there are many other occurrences of leaks, some still happening, like the Taylor Energy spill, which has dumped over one million gallons of oil over fourteen years. The fact that there have been pipeline to well head leaks every few years by some of the industry’s best operators show that the environmental danger cannot be sufficiently eliminated to justify the risks more offshore drilling presents.”

In his testimony, Rep. Rooney added that the U.S. doesn’t need offshore drilling off the Florida coast in order to ensure its energy security:

“In addition to the risks to our economy, we don’t need to take this risk to be energy secure anymore. The United States is now a net exporter of oil, meaning that current supply exceeds domestic demand. The economic, environmental, and national security case for extending the drilling moratorium is strong. We must act now to safeguard our Gulf and our way of life in Florida.” 

Original cosponsor Rep. Kathy Castor (D-FL) notes that offshore oil and gas drilling threatens Florida’s economy as well as overall U.S. military readiness:

“I have been working with my Republican colleague U.S. Rep. Francis Rooney to do everything possible to protect Florida’s coasts from oil drilling permanently, especially as the federal prohibition for drilling off the west coast expires in 2022. Florida’s beautiful beaches and our economy are tied to clean water and clean air. Oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico poses a serious threat to our natural environment, our economy and our national security.  According to the Department of Defense, the Gulf is a vital training area critical to readiness. Floridians are keenly aware of the negative impacts of oil and gas drilling off our coasts. It is clear that we must act now. I am glad to see all of Florida’s Congressional Delegation united at a time when President Trump has put our coastline, our environment and our economy in the crosshairs.”

Explore Offshore, a group founded by the American Petroleum Institute (the United States’ largest trade association for the oil and gas industry), supports offshore drilling in most of the United States’ waters, including off the Florida coast. The organization argues that offshore drilling is key to energy independence, national security, and jobs. Former Virginia Gov. Jim Webb, who is a member of Explore Offshore’s leadership committee, says the U.S. can’t be secure without offshore drilling. After meeting with business leaders in Pensacola, Florida, he said:

“A lot of these wells are 120 miles away from the coastline. What I try to say when I'm in Virginia and the Washington area is it's like standing in Washington D.C. and trying to see Philadelphia. My objective down here is to suggest the energy needs of the country - that we are not secure nationally unless we can be independent in our energy needs and the ability to explore offshore at this point  after these areas have been closed off for so long - would be a good move for the country to make.”

Former VA Secretary Jim Nicholson, who is also a member of Explore Offshore’s leadership team, argues that exploration in the range of 80-120 miles offshore, as the group is proposing, wouldn’t be visible from land. While he acknowledges that concerns about another oil spill like Deepwater Horizon are understandable, he argues that there have been many technological advances since then which reduce the risk of such an incident’s recurrence. To make the point that a single incident shouldn’t end offshore drilling entirely, Nicholson draws a comparison between offshore drilling and space exploration, observing, “We lost space shuttles. We didn’t stop the exploration of space.”

In January 2018, the Trump administration announced plans to allow new offshore oil and gas drilling in nearly all U.S. coastal waters, including the Gulf of Mexico, Florida Straits, and Florida’s Atlantic coast. However, opposition from both of Florida’s then-senators, Sens. Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Bill Nelson (D-FL), along with a bipartisan group of Florida’s House members, opposed the plan. Subsequently, then-Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke backtracked, declaring Florida’s environment and tourist economy made it “obviously unique” and crediting then-Gov. Rick Scott for the policy change. Skeptics saw the move as a political ploy to widen Scott’s appeal in the 2018 senatorial race against Nelson (which he narrowly won); and the administration’s position change was never codified into policy or subjected to formal review. 

This legislation passed the House Committee on Natural Resources by a 24-12 roll call vote with the support of 18 bipartisan cosponsors, including nine Democrats and nine Republicans. Last Congress, it had 14 bipartisan cosponsors, including 13 Republicans and one Democrat, and didn’t receive a committee vote. The Surfrider Foundation supports this bill.


Of Note: In February 2019, the entire Florida congressional delegation wrote a letter to Acting Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt (a former energy lobbyist) demanding that the Dept. of the Interior take formal action to prohibit drilling off Florida’s coast. They observed that offshore drilling would destroy the state’s coasts and, consequently, the tourism and fishing economies: 

“Florida’s natural resources and economy, as well as the military mission as expressed by the Department of Defense, cannot bear the risk and devastating impacts of offshore drilling. We urge you to take formal action to exempt drilling off Florida’s coast form the five year plan for oil and gas lease sales. Florida’s economic well-being is dependent upon our state’s fragile and treasured coasts. Clean coasts and healthy ocean are the fundamental underpinning of jobs and revenue in our communities. Florida’s coastal communities thrive in concert with a healthy marine environment. Views littered with drilling platforms, industrialization of coastline and oil on our beaches spell disaster for Florida’s economy and our neighbors who rely on tourism, fishing and related business.” 

The Florida delegation also added that the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill proved that Florida’s economy and environment are sensitive to oil spills’ and offshore drillling’s impacts

“We saw, firsthand, the destruction offshore drilling can have on ocean health, coastlines, and tourism in 2010 during the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Tourism dropped across the state, including areas that were unaffected by the rig explosion. Even without a blowout, offshore oil rigs dump tons of drilling muds, fluids, and metal cuttings -- including toxic metals and carcinogens -- into the ocean, and pose a risk to human health, marine ecosystems, and wildlife.” 

The Florida delegation also argued that U.S. military interests require prohibiting drilling off Florida’s coasts. Observing that the eastern Gulf of Mexico is a critical training area for the U.S. military, and that the Dept. of Defense (DOD) has classified the area an “irreplaceable national asset” for combat force readiness, they argued that “[a]ny oil and gas development would be an obstacle to military preparedness and national security.”

The industries that would be hurt by offshore oil and gas development are worth billions. Fishing, tourism, and recreation combined are worth $37.4 billion in GDP (including $17.5 billion from the Gulf coast alone), supporting over 600,000 jobs.

Florida voters approved a Constitutional Amendment (Amendment 9) banning offshore drilling in state waters by a 68.9% vote in 2018. However, St. Pete Beach, Florida Mayor Alan Johnson says the state remains “at the mercy of what happens in Washington” on the issue of offshore drilling. This is because state waters extend three nautical miles off the coast, but states don’t have direct control over federal waters.

Johnson’s fears are valid: in November 2018, the National Marine Fisheries Service issued “incidental harassment authorizations” allowing five companies to use seismic airguns to explore potential oil and gas fields off the Atlantic coast from Delaware to Cape Canaveral (in central Florida). Ten states’ attorneys general (although not Florida’s attorney general) have joined Oceana and eight other conservation groups to sue the Fisheries Service and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (who oversees the Fisheries Service) to impede the seismic survey process.

Additionally, if Congress doesn’t extend the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act, which imposes a moratorium on oil drilling and exploration, the Act will expire in 2022. Environmentalists warn that the subsequent legal vacuum would invite drilling in the eastern Gulf, close to Florida’s western coast.


Media:

AKA

Protecting and Securing Florida's Coastline Act of 2019

Official Title

To amend the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 to permanently extend the moratorium on leasing in certain areas of the Gulf of Mexico.

    Off shore drilling should be banned in all USA waters. Energy independence and security are better accomplished by RENEWABLE ENERGY. Which, by the way, will create MORE jobs, MORE economic development, and MORE national security than fossils fuel ever can. So. The first point is that there are a huge number of people employed in renewable energy jobs globally. There are almost 10 million of them around the world. Slightly over 3 million are employed in solar power. Large hydropower employs about 1.5 million people, and 1.2 million are in wind power employment. Advanced energy — which includes solar, wind, energy efficiency, energy storage and EVs — contributed $1.4 trillion to the global economy in 2016. (The US portion of this amount was $200 billion.) In the US, 45 has whinged on about the importance of coal jobs, but they actually aren’t all that significant when put in context. The US coal industry only employs about 76,000 workers, which is less than many industries. For example, used car dealerships have a total of about 138,000 workers, casinos employ about 99,000 people, as do travel agencies. Museums, radio stations, and breweries and wineries all have more workers than coal does. In fact, over 260,000 Americans are employed by the solar power industry, and that total blows away the number of coal jobs — it’s well over three times more! Imagine if strong solar power industries were stimulated in West Virginia and Ohio. Easily beating coal again is the wind power industry, with over 100,000 jobs. Also, NREL published an article in 2017 stating that wind power technician was the fastest growing job in the country. Funny how Trump doesn’t mention that, and actually has a history of complaining about wind power and suing to try to block wind farms. Another high-demand cleantech job is solar PV installer. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median pay for PV installers is about $39,000/yr. For the wind power service tech job, it is $52,000. Would you rather work outdoors in unpolluted air or in a coal mine breathing coal dust which may cause you to die prematurely? You might have noticed how dismal coal’s future looks and how bright it is for wind power. “To achieve 20% wind power by 2030, the U.S. Department of Energy estimates that the United States will require more than 100,000 additional wind turbines, creating more than 500,000 new jobs.” What was that … potentially 500,000 new wind power jobs? What coal jobs? They could retrain the whole coal industry and still need more than FOUR HUNDRED THOUSAND MORE PEOPLE. So, if that estimate is accurate, there would be over 600,000 jobs in wind power just in the US. That figure might sound kind of nuts, but it has been referenced many times. “According to the Wind Vision Report, wind has the potential to support more than 600,000 jobs in manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and supporting services by 2050.” At the state level, the numbers look promising too, Texas alone may have 31,500 wind power jobs by 2020, Colorado could have 22,000, and Iowa about 17,000. Another benefit is that wind turbines can be installed in rural areas at existing farms to provide much-needed income to local people. Here’s another fascinating example: “The report looked at the 23 largest wind farms in Illinois, finding that they will add almost $6 billion to local economies over their lifetimes and have resulted in the creation of more than 19,000 jobs during the construction periods. The projects will also support 814 permanent jobs in the state.” The Union of Concerned Scientists made a great point in one its recent articles on renewable energy: “Compared with fossil fuel technologies, which are typically mechanized and capital-intensive, the renewable energy industry is more labor intensive. Solar panels need humans to install them; wind farms need technicians for maintenance. This means that, on average, more jobs are created for each unit of electricity generated from renewable sources than from fossil fuels.” That is true even when wind and solar power are cheaper for the customer. An NREL document backed up this insight as well. “There are two main reasons why renewable energy technologies offer an economic advantage: (1) they are labor intensive, so they generally create more jobs per dollar invested than conventional electricity generation technologies, and (2) they use primarily indigenous resources, so most of the energy dollars can be kept at home.” So, renewable energy can generate better jobs and more of them. Of course, renewable energy contributes more economically than only jobs and pollution reduction. An IRENA report includes a reference to how stimulating renewable energy investment can be. “Doubling the share of renewables in the global energy mix by 2030 would increase global GDP by up to 1.1% or USD 1.3 trillion. The report shows that such a transition increases global GDP in 2030 between 0.6% and 1.1%, or between around USD 700 billion and USD 1.3 trillion compared to business as usual.” Another key, and very striking, benefit is how renewable energy investment can impact trade. “For fossil fuel importers, the switch to a greater share of renewables has potentially favourable trade implications. Reducing fuel imports can improve trade balance and improve GDP. The EU33 improves its net exports by USD 15 billion when the renewables share is doubled and by USD 21 billion in the higher electrification case.” According to an analysis conducted by the Union of Concerned Scientists, implementing a national 25% by 2025 renewable electric standard would result in the following benefits: “$263.4 billion in new capital investment for RE technologies, $13.5 billion in new landowner income from biomass production and/or wind land lease payments, and $11.5 billion in new property tax revenue for local communities. A single program created by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was very stimulating to the US national economy (at a critical time). “NREL’s analysis estimates that up to 75,000 direct and indirect jobs and up to $44 billion in total economic output were supported by the design, manufacturing, construction, and installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind projects funded by the #1603 Treasury grant program. In addition, the study estimates that the operation and maintenance of these solar and wind facilities will continue to sustain up to $1.8 billion per year in economic output over the lifetime of the facilities (20–30 years).” Wind power has contributed greatly to the US economy in just in the last dozen years or so. “Since 2005, American wind power has attracted more than $100 billion in new investment. At the current rate, the wind industry is investing between $10 billion and $20 billion per year in the U.S. economy.” Another key point is the amount of manufacturing that takes place here in America. “Now, more than 50% of a U.S.-installed turbine’s value is produced in America, a twelve-fold increase from just a few years ago. Some turbine manufacturers plan to make 100% of their components in America, and the trend is expected to continue.” Currently, wind power contributes about $20 billion a year in value to the US economy, and it has been projected that amount will rise to $24 billion by 2020. Wind power is more stable than fossil fuels in this regard. “Because the electricity from wind farms is sold at a fixed price over a long period of time (e.g. 20+ years) and its fuel is free, wind energy mitigates the price uncertainty that fuel costs add to traditional sources of energy.” The Solar Foundation also released a report containing an astonishing figure — “the U.S. solar industry added $154 billion in economic output in 2016.” Researchers at UC Berkeley studied the climate and health benefits of solar and wind power in the US and came up with equally huge benefits. “The climate benefit estimates ranged from $5 billion to $106 billion, with an additional $30 billion to $113 billion in air quality and public health benefits. And that’s just the estimated economic benefits of the averted 3,000 to 12,000 premature deaths—it doesn’t count things like sub-lethal medical issues and lost productivity, much less the personal benefits to individual lives.” On the low end, the combined values are $35 billion in benefits. At the top, it has the number at $219 billion. And I’ve only talked about money. I haven’t talked about climate change at all. So once again sneakyPete, YOU ARE WRONG and you’re wrongness is abundantly and obviously provable. It’s amazing how science and facts work.
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    Come On Democrats, Don’t Let The Environmentalist Run You Offshore drilling off the entire U.S. coastline, including off Florida’s coastline, is needed to ensure U.S. energy independence. Expanding offshore drilling will also create jobs, spur economic growth, and boost national security. SneakyPete..... 😾😾😾😾😾. M9.8.19.....
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    All offshore drilling needs to be banned. Period. Protect our oceans!!!
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    Offshore drilling should not be allowed on any United States coast, not just Florida.
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    Off shore drilling must stop. Why start something that will have to stop once we have a rationale government in place. If we (God forbid) do not dump trump, money will be pulled out quickly as the wealthy rush to find shelter from the ravages of unstoppable climate change. In the interim, it would be much quicker to drill on land. I understand that Mar-a-logo has some prime oil potential.
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    I'm not a fan of Florida and the far right that is Florida and I'm not the least concerned about their future because they support a person of trumps standards! I do support the ocean and its right to to be free of greed and destruction of drilling it's beautiful waters! Keep your hands off the oceans, they are already on a death spiral, do to human greed and carelessness!
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    Offshore drilling should be banned everywhere.
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    Again,two words Deepwater Horizon Let’s try really really hard to learn from our mistakes. Hmmmm ? 25th for the 45th 419 days till E day
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    Just be sure to start in front of Mara lago.
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    Can u imagine if Dorian hit that coast with oil rigs, or did u forget what happened with Hurricane Katrina?
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    The fossil fuel industry is trying to squeeze every dollar out of the earth at the cost of the health of the planet and the people. Ban drilling off the coast of florida, which is some of the most sensitive marine habitats in the US
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    We need to be moving our economy towards renewable resources as much as possible instead of relying on a quickly diminishing resource.
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    Severe environmental concerns for all living creatures is the number one reason to ban drilling anywhere. Look for safer alternative solutions to the problem.
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    In fact, it needs to be banned everywhere, and forever. The reliance on fossil fuels is an addiction, and like all addictions, it will kill us. It already is.
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    We don’t need more oil drilling! We need more solar, wind, and geothermal energy!
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    No, energy independence is crucial to our security.
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    All efforts need to go toward renewable energy sources. Absolutely no new developments in greenhouse gas emitting energy sources are necessary. All currently existing sources of energy that contribute to climate change absolutely must be eliminated as soon as possible. Our representatives and senators have an obligation to listen to professionals and take legislative action when necessary. According to climate science, action was needed decades ago. Uphold your responsibility and fight against climate change.
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    With how many Cat5 hurricanes we've had the last few years, drinking off of Florida would be a recipe for disaster. A Cat4/5 hurricane is going to knock out all of that and create huge spills in our ocean. More pollution that we don't need.
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    Renewable energy is cheaper and, well, renewable.
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    It should be banned everywhere. Go Green or go home.
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