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house Bill H.R. 1560

In the Name of Cyber Security, Should It Be Easier for Companies to Share Information With the Government?

Argument in favor

Cyber threats are an increasingly dangerous threat to American industry and consumer privacy. This bill not only finds ways to help the private sector share helpful information with the government, but it also protects those companies from lawsuits, plus strong privacy protections for consumers.

R.K.'s Opinion
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04/20/2015
Freedom is not free we must do everything we can to protect our country and it's citizens
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Nathank1989's Opinion
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04/20/2015
As long as the protections against spying/personal data collection and whistleblower protections remain in the bill, I'd vote for it. I value my virtual privacy, but a value it more against foreign attacks than the NSA. At least the NSA won't steal your identity
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Felipe's Opinion
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04/20/2015
Because we live in very unsure times, if the limited loss of privacy has to be sacrificed to help the MAJORITY of us in the USA, then so be it, as long as this is communicated and expressed publicly, the companies disclosing this information, it should be allowed.
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Argument opposed

This bill gives government intelligence agencies a free pass to increase cyber surveillance of people in the U.S. — and might even undermine cybersecurity rather than enhance it. The U.S. needs NSA reforms before it can start building channels for companies to share information with the government.

James's Opinion
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04/21/2015
Companies should not be spies of the AMERICAN people. If you can't get a warrant for information you should not be able to buy it through corporate cooperation, who ever you want to make it sound.
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SFNativeboy's Opinion
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04/21/2015
Start with NSA reforms BEFORE we consider this bill as a possibility. Then this could be justifiable, counting with warrant strings-attached as well.
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StratonGarrard's Opinion
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04/21/2015
This bill only further advances the degradation of privacy that began in the 90s with the actions of the DEA in wiretapping phones. Americans must rally against government encroachment upon the wall of privacy that so faithfully protects the valley of freedom.
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bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs
  • The house Passed April 22nd, 2015
    Roll Call Vote 307 Yea / 116 Nay
    IntroducedMarch 24th, 2015

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What is House Bill H.R. 1560?

This bill seeks to improve national cyber security by creating new procedures for private sector companies to share information with the government — without the fear of being sued.


First, the bill would set up a system where the government can share classified information with non-government affiliated parties (private sector organizations), and where those non-government parties can share their information with the government. The government would be able to use the information gathered for cases against both cyber and physical crimes. 


All of this information would be monitored and managed by a new organization called the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center (CTIIC). This entity would report to the Director of National Intelligence.


This bill would make sharing easier through a series of liability protections. Participating organizations would be protected from lawsuits by people who want compensation for having their information shared. If you wanted to sue FourSquare because it shared your check-in location with the Feds in a case against you, well, tough.


At the same time, it also comes with a number of elements aimed at protecting privacy. It specifically bans spying or collecting personal information on an individual. Under the bill, when organizations acquired information, they would have to analyze it to determine if it has a person’s private information and, if it does, remove those parts from their collection. The Attorney General himself has to vet it for privacy issues. The bill also comes with a whistleblower protection.

Impact

People that use digital technology, the private sector companies that produce and use that technology, the NSA and other surveillance organizations, the Attorney General, and the Director of National Intelligence.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 1560

$186.00 Million
The CBO estimates that implementing this bill, with all of the information that would have to be managed and monitored, would cost $186 million from 2016 to 2020.

More Information

In Depth:

This bill has bipartisan support. Three Democrats and five Republicans join Sponsoring Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) in co-sponsoring it. It’s very similar to the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), a bill currently in the Senate — however there are key differences: 

"The Senate bill [has] inspired fierce opposition from privacy advocates who say vague language gives intelligence agencies too much leeway to define what kind of “defensive measures” they can carry out for “cybersecurity purposes.”
Another key difference between the bills is that the Senate bill would force private companies trying to share information to first send it through the Department of Homeland Security. The House bill has no such stipulation."   


Of Note: 

This bill comes after a series of high-profile hacks on large companies in recent years. In November of 2014, a group called Guardians of Peace hacked Sony Pictures, taking with it 100 terrabytes of data and shutting down phone and email service. A number of movies and private emails, as well as employees’ personal information made it onto the Internet. A year earlier, credit card information for everyone who shopped at Target in a three week period was hacked and stolen.


This bill would make it easier for companies like Sony and Target to work with the federal government to keep stuff like this from happening. But privacy advocates aren’t exactly keen on the idea of big companies sharing information with the government. According to leaked documents, tech giants like Google and Facebook have already shared information with the government through the controversial PRISM program. This bill could have the potential to expand and institutionalize that kind of activity.


Media:

Sponsoring Rep. Devin Nunes Speech

CBO Cost Estimate

Reuters

The House Permanent Select Committee

National Journal

International Business Times

The Hill (In Favor)


Summary by James Helmsworth

(Photo Credit: Flickr user chadmiller

AKA

Protecting Cyber Networks Act

Official Title

To improve cybersecurity in the United States through enhanced sharing of information about cybersecurity threats, to amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance multi-directional sharing of information related to cybersecurity risks and strengthen privacy and civil liberties protections, and for other purposes.

    Freedom is not free we must do everything we can to protect our country and it's citizens
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    Companies should not be spies of the AMERICAN people. If you can't get a warrant for information you should not be able to buy it through corporate cooperation, who ever you want to make it sound.
    Like (24)
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    Start with NSA reforms BEFORE we consider this bill as a possibility. Then this could be justifiable, counting with warrant strings-attached as well.
    Like (18)
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    This bill only further advances the degradation of privacy that began in the 90s with the actions of the DEA in wiretapping phones. Americans must rally against government encroachment upon the wall of privacy that so faithfully protects the valley of freedom.
    Like (9)
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    That is what court warrants are for, only then should the government have access to any data on an individual held by a private business.
    Like (7)
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    As long as the protections against spying/personal data collection and whistleblower protections remain in the bill, I'd vote for it. I value my virtual privacy, but a value it more against foreign attacks than the NSA. At least the NSA won't steal your identity
    Like (4)
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    There is no more intrusion that having the government knowin everything
    Like (3)
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    Because we live in very unsure times, if the limited loss of privacy has to be sacrificed to help the MAJORITY of us in the USA, then so be it, as long as this is communicated and expressed publicly, the companies disclosing this information, it should be allowed.
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    These decisions should be made by the judiciary, not enticed by inducement.
    Like (2)
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    Govt needs a policy and practice founded in ethics and high principles before anyone shares anything with them
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    Open policy open books all should be SOW --- nothing to hide, no reason not too
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    As long as individuals are notified by said companies to opt in for such information to be shared.
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    We need to definitively establish how the NSA exists to protect and serve the American people and what that entails before we start handing them people's info. It would be great if they were there to design and manage aggregate security information to create better security systems for all internet providers and services, but it seems like they're way better at breaking into systems than making anything airtight (which is the only hard part of cyber security and what the world DESPERATELY needs). So lets start by making the NSA a force for the PROTECTION of citizen's information, the police a response to malicious crimes that DO happen, the FBI a simple interstate policing organization and the CIA a protection against any foreign/outsider threats. Lets establish those domains before we just let it be a predatory free-for-all on the American people and the world.
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    The NSA has already proven it is easy enough for them to collect information on innocent law abiding citizens in the "name of national security" so this is a big nay vote.
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    The US government under the current regime has already shown they cannot be trusted using the IRS among other things.
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    The government does not need more surveillance than it already has. I am opposed any type of infringement on our rights as citizens.
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    This bill gives government intelligence agencies a free pass to increase cyber surveillance of people in the U.S. — and might even undermine cybersecurity rather than enhance it. The U.S. needs NSA reforms before it can start building channels for companies to share information with the government.
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    Under the constitution the government has power to protect our rights which come from our humanity not from the government, everyone has a right to due process and no information shall be given about an individual without a warrant signed by a neutral judge. #repealthepatriotact #mindyourownbusiness #privacyisaright
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    In the name of freedom, attempts to curb the protections of the Constitution through legislation or executive order are treason. There is a proper way to deal with the changing landscape of surveillance and privacy in the information age--and it requires not only an amendment, but some thought. -a
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    How long before this voluntary sharing of information becomes mandatory?
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