Like Countable?

Install the App
TRY NOW

house Bill H.R. 1551

Modernizing Music Copyright Law to Ensure Digital Services Pay Royalties

Argument in favor

Copyright law as it relates to music is badly outdated, and this bipartisan bill would ensure that artists, producers, and engineers get paid royalties by digital streaming services.

Lee's Opinion
···
10/11/2018
It’s simple really: Artists who put in all the work to create something marketable must be compensated and profit.
Like (3)
Follow
Share
Brian's Opinion
···
09/27/2018
Copyright law as it relates to music is badly outdated, and this bipartisan bill would ensure that artists, producers, and engineers get paid royalties by digital streaming services.
Like (2)
Follow
Share
Alice's Opinion
···
10/12/2018
Musicians, artists, composers should get paid for their work. Royalties are the only way for them to get the money they deserve. Nobody should work for nothing.
Like (2)
Follow
Share

Argument opposed

There’s no need to update music copyright law to reflect changes in technology, as artists are able to collect royalties and earn a living the way the law is currently.

Janis's Opinion
···
06/19/2017
Task credits for the rich. No, we need to move to green energy it provides job growth.
Like (1)
Follow
Share
Karen's Opinion
···
06/19/2017
(2) allow public entities to transfer the credit to project partners. Is this, once again, a way for the wealthy to get tax credits? Since a Republican introduced it, probably yes
Like (1)
Follow
Share
Marsha's Opinion
···
06/20/2017
Tax credit for advanced nuclear is a bad idea
Like
Follow
Share

bill Progress


  • EnactedOctober 11th, 2018
    The President signed this bill into law
  • The senate Passed September 18th, 2018
    Passed by Voice Vote
  • The house Passed June 20th, 2017
    Passed by Voice Vote
      house Committees
      Committee on Ways and Means
    IntroducedMarch 15th, 2017

Log in or create an account to see how your Reps voted!

What is House Bill H.R. 1551?

This bill — the Orrin G. Hatch-Bob Goodlatte Music Modernization Act — would update several provisions of U.S. copyright law regarding music licensing to reflect how digital music services operate while ensuring that royalties can be collected on pre-1972 recordings and by creative professionals. A summary of its three sections (the Musical Modernization Act, the Classics Protection and Access Act, and the AMP Act) can be found below.

Musical Works Modernization Act

This section would establish a music licensing collective to license musical copyrights, collect and distribute royalties from digital music providers. It would also maintain a public database of compositions, their owners, who wrote them, and who administers them. The costs of maintaining the new non-profit collective would be paid for through royalties from licensees.

The Copyright Royalty Board would use uniform rate setting standards for all music services which would be established by proceedings in which copyright holders and licensees negotiate a rate schedule, which would be in effect until a successor schedule is agreed by the parties.

Classics Protection and Access Act

This section would require the payment of royalties to both rights holders and artists for the use of their recordings which were made before 1972. Currently, digital broadcasters don’t pay royalties on songs recorded prior to 1972.

Allocation for Music Producers (AMP) Act

This section would enable record producers, sound engineers, and other creative professionals to receive compensation for their work when their recordings are used on satellite and online radio services.

Its full title is the Allocation for Music Producers (AMP) Act.

Impact

Musicians, producers, and engineers; the music licensing collective; and digital music services.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 1551

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-Depth: Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) said his bill “touches all sectors of the music industry and makes important reforms to ensure that songwriters, musicians, and other key contributors to American music are treated fairly.” He added:

“There’s a reason this bill passed the Senate unanimously, and why it will shortly pass the House with overwhelming support. And that’s because all sides of the music industry came together to find a way to make our music laws better. To make them function properly. To update them for the digital age. No side got everything it wanted. But everyone got something. At the end of the day, we have a piece of legislation we can all be proud of.”

The House passed its own version of the Music Modernization Act in April 2018 on a 415-0 vote.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: iStock.com / Chalffy)

AKA

Allocation for Music Producers Act

Official Title

An Act to modernize copyright law, and for other purposes.

    It’s simple really: Artists who put in all the work to create something marketable must be compensated and profit.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    Copyright law as it relates to music is badly outdated, and this bipartisan bill would ensure that artists, producers, and engineers get paid royalties by digital streaming services.
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    Musicians, artists, composers should get paid for their work. Royalties are the only way for them to get the money they deserve. Nobody should work for nothing.
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    (2) allow public entities to transfer the credit to project partners. Is this, once again, a way for the wealthy to get tax credits? Since a Republican introduced it, probably yes
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    You think all artists are rich bringing in thousands each paycheck or selling out shows every town they go. Many good artists out there who are either starting up or don’t play the special sort of music class the public today goes crazy for (terrible rap/teen pop) who struggle to make money. They try to get there name out by listing there music on streaming services but can’t match the fan base of other artists.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    This is long overdue. Artists and the professionals that are integral to bringing a musical work to fruition have been shortchanged since the evolution of digital
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Task credits for the rich. No, we need to move to green energy it provides job growth.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    No more tax credits for energy means other than GREEN methods like solar, wind, and geothermal.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    Sound like tax credits for the elite! No!
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    Tax credit for advanced nuclear is a bad idea
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    It is time to move away from nuclear energy. Stop giving tax credits to uphold out dated models.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    Take with a grain of salt. South Carolina Republican rep. High surface coal mining state. It's fishy.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    Two good ideas and one bad. This is why copyright reform never goes anywhere. The bad part of this bill is the "Classics Act" part. It's misleading at best to claim music recordings made before 1972 aren't covered. They are, by state laws. This act uses the worst of those laws to federalize the system. Another power grab from the legacy recording industry.
    Like
    Follow
    Share