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The Latest: Senators Debate the GOP Tax Reform Bill

by Countable | 12.2.17

(Update: 12/2 1:52am ET): The Senate passed its amended version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act on a 51-49 vote.


With Wednesday’s successful 52-48 vote to start debate on the Senate GOP tax reform plan, senators will now consider numerous amendments during 20 hours of floor debate throughout the rest of this week with an eye toward a passage vote on Friday.

You can see the amendments and other procedural motions that have been or will be brought up for a vote below after they’ve been officially announced.

Past Votes

Hatch-Murkowski Amendment: This amendment offered by Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) would replace the legislative text of this bill with text approved by the Senate's Budget Committee and legislation from the Energy & Natural Resources Committee related to the Arctic National WIldlife Refuge. Adopted by voice vote. 12/2 1:52am ET

Merkley Amendment: This amendment offered by Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR) would eliminate a provision that exempts higher education institutions that choose to forego federal funding for its students from the tax on university endowments. Passed 52-48. 12/2 1:20am ET

Cantwell Amendment: This amendment offered by Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA) would strike the provision of the bill that allows for drilling on the non-wilderness coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. Failed 48-52. 12/2 1am ET

Manchin Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion offered by Sen. joe Manchin (D-WV) to send the bill to the Finance Committee to be revised so that individual income tax cuts are permanent. Failed 38-61. 12/2 12:40am ET

Kaine Amendment: This amendment offered by Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA) keeps the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) as is, reduces the corporate income tax rate to 25%, makes individual income tax cuts for working and middle class families permanent. Because it would waive the Budget Act, this vote requires 60 votes to be successful. Failed 34-66. 12/2 12:10am ET

Cruz Amendment: This amendment offered by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) would allow funds from 529 Savings Plans to be used on private or parochial school expenses. Passed 51-50 with a tiebreaking vote from Vice President Mike Pence 12/1 11:39pm ET

Menendez Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion offered by Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ) to send the bill back to the Finance Committee to be revised so that the repeal of the state and local tax deduction would be reversed if states' investment and funding for certain services decline, or taxes on the middle class increase. It'd require a simple majority to be successful. Failed 48-52 12/1 11:10pm ET

Rubio-Lee Amendment: This amendment offered by Sens. Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Mike Lee (R-UT) would increase the child tax credit to $2,000 and pay for it by setting the corporate income tax rate at 20.9%. Because it would waive the Budget Act, this vote requires 60 votes to be successful. Failed 29-71. 12/1 10:50pm ET

Brown Amendment: This amendment offered by Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) would provide for an expanded child and family credit. Because it would waive the Budget Act, this vote requires 60 votes to be successful. Failed 48-52 12/1 10:30pm ET

Sanders Amendment: This amendment offered by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) amendment would prohibit cuts to Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security. Because it would waive the Budget Act, this vote requires 60 votes to be successful. Failed 46-54. 12/1 10:10pm ET

Schumer Motion to Adjourn: This vote will be on a motion offered by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) to adjourn until Monday. Failed 48-52 12/1 9:40pm ET

Cardin Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion to send the bill back to the Finance Committee to be revised to require that tax revenue generated by companies repatriating overseas profits be invested in infrastructure. Failed 44-56 12/1 2pm ET

Baldwin Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion by Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) to send the bill back to the Finance Committee to be revised so that so-called "carried interest loophole" is eliminated. That provision of the tax code allows investment funds to be structured as a partnership, which means they pay taxes on capital gains instead of ordinary income, which is generally taxed at a lower rate. (Baldwin introduced this legislation as a standalone bill you can read here.) Failed 48-52. 12/1 12pm ET

Nelson Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion by Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) to send the bill back to the Finance Committee to be revised so that the cut in tax rates for middle class individuals be made permanent. Failed 48-52.12/1 12pm ET

Stabenow Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) to send the bill back to the FInance Committee to be revised to include a trigger to restore corporate tax rates to their current level if average household wages don't rise by $4,000 in the next two years. Failed 45-55. 11/30 7pm

King Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion by Sen. Angus King (I-ME) to send the bill back to the Finance Committee to be revised to be deficit neutral. Failed 48-52. 11/30 4:30pm ET

Casey Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion by Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA) to send the bill back to the Finance Committee to be revised to reverse tax breaks for profitable corporations if workers wages don't go up. Failed 48-51. 11/30 2:15pm ET

Brown Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion by Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) to send the bill back to the Finance Committee to be revised to include a tax credit for "Patriot" corporations. Failed 48-52. 11/30 12:20pm ET

Wyden Motion to Commit: This vote will be on a motion by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) to send the bill back to the Finance Committee for revision. Failed 48-51. 11/29 5pm ET

Tell your senators how you want them to vote on these amendments and motions using the Take Action button.

— Eric Revell

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(Photo Credit: uschools / iStock)

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