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Who's Who in the Russia Investigation: Michael Flynn

by Countable | 12.26.17

Countable Explains: Who's Who in the Russia Investigation

This is Michael Flynn's page. For our index of everyone involved in the investigation, click here.

Michael Flynn

Role:

President Trump’s former National Security Adviser

Quote:

‘‘When you are given immunity, that means you probably committed a crime.’’

Flynn, then a top campaign aide to Trump, regarding Hillary Clinton’s private email servers. Later, Flynn would request immunity in exchange for cooperating with congressional investigators.

Latest news:

  • December 19, 2017: It's reported that President Donald Trump's transition team researched ways for Flynn to send encrypted messages--just prior to his conversations with the former Russian ambassador to the U.S. The emails, made public under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), reveal that the General Services Administration (GSA) approved the transition team to use Signal, an app with end-to-end encryption that can delete messages almost the instant they're sent.

Key dates:

  • December 2015: Flynn is paid over $30,000 to speak at Russia’s state-run TV station, RT. (U.S. Intelligence considers RT to be a propaganda tool of the Kremlin.)

  • December 19th 2016: Obama announces new sanctions against Russia and expels 35 diplomats because of the country’s alleged interference with the 2016 presidential election.

It will later be revealed that on the same day the sanctions were announced, Flynn spoke multiple times with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. Flynn said sanctions weren’t discussed, as that would have been illegal.

  • January 15: Vice President Elect Mike Pence says he’s spoken with Flynn about his talk with Kislyak, but Flynn assured him that "they did not discuss anything having to do with the United States' decision to expel diplomats or impose censure against Russia."

  • January 26th 2017: the Justice Department warns the new administration that Flynn misled officials, making him vulnerable to Russian blackmail

  • February 13: Flynn resigns (or gets fired).

  • April 2017: Reuters reports that the Pentagon inspector general has launched an investigation into whether Flynn "accepted money from foreign entities without the required approval."

  • June 2017: Flynn turns over around 600 pages of documents to the Senate Intelligence committee as part of its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

  • November 5, 2017: It’s reported that Mueller has gathered sufficient evidence to bring charges against Flynn and his son, Michael Flynn, Jr. According to multiple sources, Flynn and his son were set to be paid $15 million to forcibly remove Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen from the U.S. and deliver him to the Turkish government; Turkish President Recep Erdogan views Gulen as a political dissident. Flynn’s lawyer says the "allegations about General Flynn, ranging from kidnapping to bribery" are “false.”

  • December 1, 2017: Flynn pleads guilty to lying to the FBI about conversations with former Russian Ambassador to the U.S., Sergey Kislyak. He also discloses that he's cooperating with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. In a statement, Flynn admitted that his actions “were wrong, and, through my faith in God, I am working to set things right.”

  • December 19, 2017: It's reported that President Trump's transition team researched ways for Flynn to send encrypted messages--just prior to his conversations with the former Russian ambassador to the U.S. The emails, made public under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), reveal that the General Services Administration (GSA) approved the transition team to use Signal, an app with end-to-end encryption that can delete messages almost the instant they're sent.

Current mood:

Contrite. On December 1, 2017, Flynn said: "My guilty plea and agreement to cooperate with the Special Counsel's Office reflect a decision I made in the best interests of my family and of our country. I accept full responsibility for my actions."

Countable

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